Friday, December 14, 2018

An Interview with Dave Nicholson - AHW January 1983

Issuu.com - Read the Article

Published on Mar 18, 2012

Nearly 30 years ago — in the Arabian Horse World January 1983 issue — we interviewed endurance rider Dave Nicholson, who was named to AERC’s Hall of Fame in 1997.

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Newest Directors-At-Large to Represent AERC

AERC.org

December 12 2018

Congratulations to the Directors-at-Large who will be representing the AERC membership, beginning on March 9, 2019. Here they are, in alphabetical order. 

Olin Balch DVM 
Nina Bomar 
Mollie Krumlaw-Smith 
Robert Marshall DVM 
Mike Maul 
Heather Reynolds 
Christoph Schork 
Tim Worden

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

2018 December's Endurance Day on Horses in the Morning

Horsesinthemorning.com - Listen

Green Bean Tips, ’19 National Championships, ’18 100 Mile Champ, Endurance Day for Dec. 11, 2018


On this month’s Endurance episode we chat with AERC National 100 Mile champion Hannah Johnson, Dr. Melissa Ribley gives us a preview of the 2019 National Championships being held on the West Coast and Mary Howell has some great tips for new Endurance competitors a.k.a Green Beans.

More info and listen to the episode at:
http://www.horsesinthemorning.com/green-bean-tips-19-national-championships-18-100-mile-champ-endurance-day-for-dec-11-2018/?fbclid=IwAR3xOFAM-VDhZ1LZwDAjhWqgTODpbPdKSUB3ZgBsIGvca7N9E_vtAcbmTBE

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Arabian Horse Association dissatisfied with USEF, Considers New Governance Options

ShaneDarnell.com - Full Article

DECEMBER 6, 2018 BY SHANE DARNELL

USEF could be facing over $1.5 Million dollars in annual revenue losses if the Arabian Horse Association (AHA) decides to self govern or join other breeds considering an exit from the over regulated “Federation”.

(AHA) the largest non-Olympic breed organization with approximately 12,000 USEF members held it’s National Membership Convention last month, and voted unanimously (according to insiders) to begin a feasibility study that could result in an exit from USEF governance within 12 months.

AHA sited material revenue impact because of their exhibitor loss to non-USEF affiliated breeds. The perception among AHA members is that USEF is over regulated and offers very little in return to their breed for the cost of association...

Read more here:
http://shanedarnell.com/arabsvotechange/?fbclid=IwAR3psftBNUZfCbQ3zjoNGlT6XWW6aO5zcjtQSy4u__G-_3ObE3q-b45GJIo

Monday, December 10, 2018

Ultrarunning History Podcast 12: Endurance Riding – Part 1

Ultrarunninghistory.com - Listen and Read more

December 8 2018
By Davy Crockett

Both a podcast episode and a full article
(Listen to the podcast episode which includes a bonus running story.)

Endurance riding is the equestrian sport that includes controlled long-distance riding/racing. The sport has existed for more than a century in various forms. 100-mile trail ultramarathons, especially the Western States Endurance Run, Old Dominion 100, and Vermont 100 can trace their roots to endurance riding. Other trail 100s that emerged in the 1980s were also influenced by endurance riding practices.

Ultrarunners should feel indebted to those of the endurance riding sport who had the vision to establish some early 100-mile trail races for runners. The trail 100-miler inherited many of the same procedures of aid stations, course markings, trail work, crews, medical checks, and of course the belt buckle award. Once ultrarunners understand their history, a common kinship is felt between the two sister endurance sports. So trade in your running shoes for horse shoes for a few minutes and learn about an inspiring and adventuresome endurance riding history that impacted the sport of ultrarunning.

The Origins of the Endurance Riding Sport in America

Usually the credit for establishing the endurance riding sport is given to Wendell Robie of Auburn, California when he initiated the Western States Trail Ride (Tevis Cup) in 1955. (That history will be covered in Part 2). But endurance riding competitions of various formats existed long before 1955. Vermont must be recognized as the birth place for the endurance rides in America.

Perhaps it depends on the definition for the “endurance ride.” The debate around the definition of what an endurance ride is, is similar to the definition of what an ultramarathon is. Is an ultramarathon anything over a marathon or do they start at 50 miles? One published definition for the endurance ride is “a timed test against the clock of an individual horse/rider team’s ability to traverse a marked, measured cross-county “trail” over natural terrain consisting of a distance of 50 to 100 miles in one day.” That is a modern, very limited definition especially the “trail” limitation, and the one-day limitation. But it still does apply to many very early endurance rides that predated the Western States Trail Ride...

Read more and listen here:
http://ultrarunninghistory.com/endurance-riding-1/?fbclid=IwAR2bFLPIudofhy1duOxKwjaDfH1yzB-xnlUBtWcOPjC5PCwvdKtJbOdEPuQ

Thursday, December 06, 2018

2019 Distance Horse National Championships

Distance Nationals is heading back to Alanna & Gunnar Franks Ranch in Vinita, Okla. from October 25-27.

The American Saddlebred Registry (ASR) will join our growing list of partnered breeds, which include: the Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC), Paso Fino Horse Association (PFHA), Performance Shagya-Arabian Registry (PShR), American Morgan Horse Association (AMHA), and the Akhal-Teke Association of America (ATAA).

Remember, along with all of the National Championships offered, there are multiple Open Owl Hoot 25 Mile LD’s and 50 Mile rides along with an Open Owl Hoot 100 Mile ride and a CTR. These Open rides do not require qualifications or membership and are open to any breed.

More information at:
https://www.arabianhorses.org/competition/national-events/distance-nationals/

Monday, December 03, 2018

Who You Callin' Old: 19-year-old Endurance Horse Fire Mt Malabar is Still On Fire



At 19, Fire Mt Malabar has over 7000 miles, 16 first places, and 47 Best Conditions (3rd on the all-time BC list). And he's not done yet.


December 3 2018
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

The 16-hand, slight bay gelding with a star and thin strip and 4 white socks is a familiar sight going down the Northwest and Mountain region endurance trails. But you might do a double take at his rider.

Lee Pearce of Baker City, Oregon, was Fire Mt Malabar's (almost) exclusive Heavyweight rider since 2006: a partnership of over 5300 miles, 43 Best Condition awards, and a 2011 National Best Condition award.

(You can read about Lee's earlier adventures with Malabar here.)

Lee on Malabar hitting 5000 miles

In 2015 Malabar and Lee headed to the Big Horn 100; they started the ride, and passed the first vet check, but then Lee stopped with him out on the trail because something wasn't right. Turned out Malabar had contracted salmonella, most likely at an overnight stopover in Dubois on the way; he became so ill that they nearly lost him at the vet clinic. He went on to recover, and Lee and Malabar came back firing on all pistons in 2016, with a 10 for 10 record, though Lee rode him more conservatively.

Now it's Lee's wife Naomi Preston who has the esteemed seat in Malabar's saddle. How she got there was a process of talking Lee out of him, since he had another nice and talented horse to ride (JAC Winterhawk), and since Naomi didn't really have a main endurance horse. "Maybe it was pity that he gave me Malabar," Naomi laughs.


Naomi had ridden Malabar on only one previous 50 mile ride in June of 2011 at the Owyhee Cheap Thrills No Frills in Idaho. "It was a magical ride. Sue Hedgecock and I rode together the whole day. [Sue rode LZP Julioslastchance, her eventual Haggin Cup winner.] It was pretty, there were wildflowers, blue sky; the two of us just had a ball. And we decided to tie for the win, because the horses were even. It was really fun." Naomi had never ridden Malabar before, and the gelding was perfect that day, since Lee had gotten the 'kinks' out of him in winning the previous day's 50.


Naomi and Malabar at City of Rocks
Fast forward 6 years to Idaho's City of Rocks Pioneer ride in June of 2017, where Naomi swung a leg aboard Malabar in a new partnership. Usually riding with Lee aboard Hawk, Naomi and Malabar finished 16 of 16 rides (810 miles) in 2017 (and don't forget the 2 rides and 100 miles with Lee before Naomi took the reins), and 18 of 19 rides in 2018 (940 miles). Their only stumbling block in 2018 was Tevis, and that was a Rider Option pull, when Naomi's metabolics went awry. "Malabar was fine," Naomi said. "I was the weak link!" (Lee and Hawk went on to finish Tevis.)

"Malabar's showing no signs of slowing down," Naomi says. "It's almost like he's got a second career. We got 4 wins and 4 Best Conditions this year.
We tied for the win of the 3-day Strawberry Fields Pioneer with Lee and Hawk - only 3 pairs did all 3 days. Very tough ride. And Malabar reached 7000 miles in September.


"We weren't pushing or anything - Malabar's just kind of on fire. He's just going so well, and his recoveries are great."

On one of those wins this fall, Naomi and Malabar tied with Christoph Schork and GE Pistol Annie at the Outlaw and the Virgin Pioneer ride in Utah. Christoph is AERC's winningest rider, and you can usually expect Christoph to be setting a smart pace at the start of rides and finishing in front. And GE Pistol Annie is no slouch, with 48 completions in 49 starts, 33 of those first places (all with Christoph), and 21 Best Conditions.

Naomi says, "We came into the lunch vet check, and I thought, well, if Malabar doesn't pulse down right away, this will be a sign he's going too fast. And they both pulsed down at the same time; Malabar of course drops to 40. Christoph and I rode together the whole day, and we had a ball."

Naomi recalled that Lee and Malabar had ridden with Christoph and Pistol Annie many years earlier. One can easily imagine the two experienced, talented endurance horses eyeballing each other in mutual recognition down the trail.


Known in his 'younger years' for some antics - spooking, bucking, going too fast - Malabar tried his tricks on Naomi just once, on her first ride with him in 2017 at City of Rocks. "We were going down a long road, and something spooked Malabar, and the wind was blowing a million miles an hour, and he took off at a gallop. So not only did he spook, but he bolted, too. Lee was thinking I was going to be roadkill, but I stayed on, and got him stopped.

"That's the only time he's really ever done anything kind of crazy with me. I was really fit and strong then. I wasn't getting off that horse. Luckily he just ran straight. But it did scare me!


"He's really settled down. I love riding him. It's just fun. We're in that zone. He reminds me a lot of riding Mustang Lady in several ways, just because he's a veteran, he knows to eat and drink, he carries a steady pace - he knows all that stuff. You know how nice it is riding a horse that's experienced."

(Naomi's phenomenal Mustang Lady entered the AERC Hall of Fame in 2001 - read about her here).


Experienced and, still, on fire. Malabar probably is getting a 'second wind' with a Lightweight rider, but it could just be that he's that good. He comes from some of the best old-time, proven bloodlines you can find in the endurance sport: Fire Mt Malabar is by Jim and Jackie Bumgardner's legendary endurance stallion and sire Sierra Fadwah (AERC Hall of Fame 1992) out of Malabar Dawn, by Malabar Amir.

While the gelding is (mostly) all business on the trail now (mostly, unless Naomi tries a side pull on him after a lunch vet check at a ride, which he does not like), he can throw in a little crow hop on training rides. "It's not anything that you'd fall off," Naomi says, "but a crop hop that says, 'I'm feeling good!'"


Generally kind of aloof to people, Malabar still knows he's quite special, coming to the pasture gate when Lee or Naomi are around, to get let out for his "special" meals. He thinks any hay on the ground is his bed. He has a bit of a sense of humor, too, taking advantage of Naomi when she's trying to put his bridle on. He puts his head in the sky because he knows that he's tall and Naomi is short and can't reach him when he does that. The only horse in the herd he can't push around is his brother Fire Mt Legacy.


Malabar knows how good he is. And he's not done yet. Lee and Naomi are planning on more multi-day rides next year, which Malabar excels at. "Lee and I really love multi-days. And we really love the Duck rides (Dave Nicholson's multi-day XP rides). The trails are beautiful, we get to see different scenery, and the camaraderie is great.

"Malabar's just that special quality of a horse that knows their job, and has fun doing it and you don't have to worry about them. It's just the ultimate.

"It's a blessing - really a blessing."


photos by Lee and Naomi, and a few by Crockett Dumas

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Long list of accomplishments accompanies Bowman to ABA helm

CSUS.edu - Full Article

Long list of accomplishments accompanies Bowman to ABA helm

Jonathan Bowman, a musician, rock-climbing instructor, and endurance equestrian – as well as an accomplished administrator – has been named Sacramento State’s new vice president for Administration and Business Affairs (ABA) and chief financial officer.

His first day at the University will be Jan. 28, 2019. He comes to Sac State from NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in Southern California, where he has been a business administration manager.

As head of ABA, Bowman will oversee a broad range of units and functions, including Space Management, Budget Planning & Administration, the Bursar’s Office, Environmental Health & Safety, Public Safety, Facilities Management, Procurement & Contracts Services, the Hornet Ticket Office, Capital Planning and Construction, and University Parking and Transportation (UTAPS).

“Hiring an individual of Jonathan’s caliber is an outstanding achievement for us,” University President Robert S. Nelsen says. “His experience in finance, entrepreneurship, facilities management, and budget oversight will significantly benefit Sacramento State.

"I look forward to working with him, and I hope that everyone will join me in welcoming him to the Hornet family.”

Bowman says a "passion for development" makes Sac State an ideal place for him.

“I’m drawn to higher education ... . I’ve spent the last 12 years on the JPL recruiting committee, helping JPL find space-crazy graduates from around the world," Bowman says. "I’ve had the pleasure of watching them transform into knowledgeable and successful professionals.

"I want to see how I can influence that thought migration at an earlier stage of education, and I look forward to helping Sac State continue to transform lives.”

Bowman went to JPL in 2005, managing the Instrument Division’s $10 million operational budget, as well as overseeing the division’s $300 million budget and 550 employees. JPL is a federally funded research and development center managed by the California Institute of Technology.

His leadership skills were acknowledged in 2014, when he received the JPL People Leadership Award, and in 2017, when he was presented JPL’s Voyager Award.

While studying for his master’s degree in Business Administration (MBA) at Pepperdine University, Bowman started his own company, MacByte Computer Consultants, which he ran for three years. He later spent 14 years with McMaster-Carr Supply Company, in Santa Fe Springs, managing departments in finance, warehouse, and sales operations.

For Bowman, moving to Sacramento will be something of a homecoming. He earned his bachelor of arts degree in Economics from UC Davis, graduating in 1988. His 19-year-old daughter, Morgan, is studying animal science there.

“I’ve told her since she was 2 that she wanted to be a veterinarian, and she still believes me,” Bowman says.

Melody Wong, Bowman’s wife of 26 years, also works at JPL. She will remain in Southern California until their son, Luke, finishes his last year of high school. Luke has applied to Sac State, where he’s considering graphic design as a major.

Wong and Morgan share Bowman’s passion for endurance horseback racing, which challenges horses and riders to compete at distances of 50, 75, and 100 miles. Bowman represented the United States in the 2003 Pan American Endurance Championships, on a 12-year-old horse named Heigh-Ho, finishing 44th out of 89 entries...

Read more here:
https://www.csus.edu/news/articles/2018/11/28/Bowman-takes-the-helm-of-Administration-and-Business-Affairs.shtml

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Endurance Horse Podcast - Episode 12


Endurancehorsepodcast - Listen

November 28 2018

TEVIS 2018 PART 3 PLUS: KEN CAMPBELL TARA LEROY MELISSA COOLICH VICTORIA CLARK COURTNEY KRUEGER LORI OLESON DARYL OWEN KEISHA WOOD

Hello and Welcome to Endurance Horse Podcast!

I’m your host, Christina Hyke, an equine photographer in Southern Wisconsin. Occasionally you will hear Jim, my husband, along with me during the intro or outtro of the podcast.

This one is a LOOOONGG episode!

Read more and listen in:
https://endurancehorsepodcast.podbean.com/e/tevis-2018-part-3-plus-ken-campbell-tara-leroy-melissa-coolich-victoria-clark-courtney-krueger-lori-oleson-daryl-owen-keisha-wood/

Thursday, November 22, 2018

2019 AERC National Championships Coming to Ridgecrest California in the Fall

November 22 2018

Qualifications for the National Championship Rides:

All entries must meet AERC qualification criteria:

50-mile ride: 300 lifetime miles (horse) AND 300 lifetime miles (rider), with at least 100 miles together. The mileage requirements must be met with endurance competitions of 50 miles or more only -- no limited distance miles count towards qualification criteria.

100-mile ride: 500 lifetime miles (horse) AND 500 lifetime miles (rider), with at least one 100 mile, one-day ride together. The mileage requirements must be met with endurance competitions of 50 miles or more only -- no limited distance miles count towards qualification criteria.

Alternate qualification (either distance): If the horse and rider team has completed together for 1,000 AERC endurance miles (rides 50 miles or more only) they are qualified to enter.

Additional Alternate qualification: All horse and rider teams who completed the previous year in the Top 10 overall standings in their region will be qualified to ride in either the 50 or 100 mile distance.

Watch this page for updates:
https://www.facebook.com/AERC2019NC/

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Claire Godwin's 27-year-old PL Mercury Named 2018 Distance Horse of the Year

Tevis Cup photo
November 2018
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

PL Mercury ("Merc"), owned and ridden by Claire Godwin, has been named AHA Distance Horse of the Year.  At 27 years of age this year, he completed 6 of 7 endurance rides, including 3 100-milers: Old Dominion in Virginia in June (6th place, ride time of 16:44.33), the Tevis Cup in California in July (13th place, ride time of 17:18), and the AERC National Championship at the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina in September (15th place, ride time of 17:44.39).

The gelding by AM Autumn Mead X Playland Lady, by Al-Marah Milton started his endurance career in 2006 with Godwin as a 15-year-old.

His overall record now boasts 5950 AERC miles with 104 completions in 112 starts, 18 out of 20 100-mile finishes.

Godwin was featured on October's Horses In The Morning radio show, speaking about Merc's Hat Trick and how she keeps the gelding happy and healthy and going strong.

2018 November's Endurance Day on Horses in the Morning


Horsesinthemorning.com - Listen


CA Fire Rescues, Wild African Ride, AERC Century Club on Endurance Day for Nov. 13, 2018

Nov 13, 2018

Hanna Bartnick shares stories from her South African Wild Coast Ride, Haily Daeumler gives us a report from the front lines of the CA wild fires and Century club rider Gary Brown stops by. Listen in...

http://www.horsesinthemorning.com/ca-fire-rescues-wild-african-ride-aerc-century-club-on-endurance-day-for-nov-13-2019/

Sunday, November 18, 2018

AERC Juniors & Young Riders: Apply for the 2019 Anne Ayala Junior Scholarship

November 18 2018

It's SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION time! If you are or know of a young AERC member (from senior year in high school through age 21), please check out the qualifications and apply by January 7, 2019.
aerc.org/static/2019scholarship.pdf
AERC members have generously supported the Anne Ayala Scholarship program with donations. This scholarship, given in memory of longtime ride manager Anne Ayala, is a wonderful opportunity for young riders who want to further their education.

For more information, see:
http://aerc.org/static/2019scholarship.pdf

Friday, November 02, 2018

Corrected: Best of the Best 100-mile Entries Due December 31 for Early Discount

November 2 2018

Welcome to Best of the Best 100! Congratulations on qualifying for this awesome event. Your dedication and conviction should make you quite proud. This accomplishment puts you in a league with a small percentage of distance riders who demonstrate the ability to conquer the ultimate endurance challenge.

40 100-mile entries are needed to hold The Best of the Best 100-mile ride on August 17, 2019 in Riverton, Wyoming. For the early discount, entries must be received by December 31, 2018.

Qualifications are:
Successful completion of no less than five (5) 100 miles in one day AERC sanctioned competitions with a minimum of one (1) in the Top Ten same horse and rider team. Alternate criteria consist of three (3) 100 miles in one day completions with one (1) in the Top Ten and two (2) multi day rides with all offered days completed. Lifetime record will apply. YOU NEED NOT BE QUALIFIED TO ENTER. MUST COMPLETE QUALIFICATONS ON OR BEFORE MAY 31, 2019.

Fees & Policies:
Entry fee for the 100 is $500. A deposit of $200 must accompany entry with the balance fees may be paid in increments with final payment due on or before May 31, 2019.
Refund policy is full refund for all monies paid before December 31, 2018. Until May 31, 2019, a full refund less $100. Entries received after January 1, 2019 will incur a $95 penalty. After May 31, 2019 one half of fees will be refunded with veterinary certificate. No entries accepted after May 31, 2019. NO SHOWS WILL NOT BE REFUNDED.

For more information on the ride, see:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/307550366666252/

Best of the Best 100-mile Entries Due December 31

November 1 2018

Welcome to Best of the Best 100! Congratulations on qualifying for this awesome event. Your dedication and conviction should make you quite proud. This accomplishment puts you in a league with a small percentage of distance riders who demonstrate the ability to conquer the ultimate endurance challenge.

40 100-mile entries are needed to hold The Best of the Best 100-mile ride on August 17, 2019 in Riverton, Wyoming.

Qualifications are:
Successful completion of no less than five (5) 100 miles in one day AERC sanctioned competitions with a minimum of one (1) in the Top Ten same horse and rider team. Alternate criteria consist of three (3) 100 miles in one day completions with one (1) in the Top Ten and two (2) multi day rides with all offered days completed. Lifetime record will apply. YOU NEED NOT BE QUALIFIED TO ENTER. MUST COMPLETE QUALIFICATONS ON OR BEFORE MAY 31, 2019.

Fees & Policies:
Entry fee for the 100 is $500. A deposit of $200 must accompany entry with the balance fees may be paid in increments with final payment due on or before May 31, 2019.
Refund policy is full refund for all monies paid before December 31, 2018. Until May 31, 2019, a full refund less $100. Entries received after January 1, 2019 will incur a $95 penalty. After May 31, 2019 one half of fees will be refunded with veterinary certificate. No entries accepted after May 31, 2019. NO SHOWS WILL NOT BE REFUNDED.

For more information on the ride, see:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/307550366666252/

Tevis Ride Dates Approved Through 2040

Teviscup.org

November 2 2018

The Board of Governors approved the Ride Dates through 2040 at their most recent meeting:

Ride Dates Through 2040

Sunday, October 28, 2018

US Equestrian Accepting Bids to Host the 2019 North American Endurance Championships and Team Challenge

USEF.org

by US Equestrian Communications Department | Oct 26, 2018, 10:27 AM EST
Lexington, Ky. – US Equestrian (USEF) is now accepting bids for the 2019 North American Endurance Championships and Team Challenge. This competition marks the first-ever USEF national championship for the discipline of endurance. The 2019 North American Endurance Championship CEI3* 160km / CEIYJ2* 120km is an unofficial FEI team competition open to teams from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

Completed applications and any supporting materials must be received by USEF on or before 5:00 pm ET on Friday, December 7, 2018. Applications and additional information can be found here.

Interested organizers should submit their completed bid applications to Kristen Brett, Director of Endurance, at kbrett@usef.org.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Going the distance: Local rider places 10th in 100-mile national championship horse race

DL-Online.com - Full Article

By Kaysey Price on Oct 18, 2018

After fifty years riding horses and more than thirty years of racing them, Teresa Fett was beginning to think she'd never get to ride in a 100-mile horse race, a dream of hers.

A test of strategy and endurance, a 100-mile is set up in "loops" of about 15 to 25 miles, the entirety of which needs to be completed within a 24-hour period — it's no easy feat. The timing had to be right for Teresa and her husband, Dale Fett, to pull it off.


"You know, it's one of those things, you've got to work at getting a horse," said Teresa, adding, "there's not a lot of horses that can do a 100-mile."

The Fetts have had many horses in their day but, either they weren't up to the challenge of the lengthy race, or the timing wasn't right for Teresa and Dale to take it on themselves — until recently, when their 13-year-old Arabian, CR Mister Aaz, proved not only could he run the 100 miles, but he could place them 10th in a national championship endurance race in North Carolina this September...

Read more here:
http://www.dl-online.com/news/4515252-going-distance-local-rider-places-10th-100-mile-national-championship-horse-race

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Is Your Horse Tough? Try the new Idaho Ironhorse Award Challenge

October 15 2018

Northwest Ride Managers Jessica Huber, Regina Rose, Steph Teeter, and Mike and Jessica Cobbley would like to introduce something really special we are offering, starting in 2019.

Together, we will be offering the all-new Idaho Ironhorse Award. If you and your horse complete ALL 9 DAYS of Idaho Pioneer rides:

City of Rocks

Top O The World

Autumn Sun

You win! We are working on really cool, one of a kind swag for this amazing feat! Plus, each successful team will get a free entry for one day at each ride the following year. And, we are gonna blast your accomplishment on every single endurance related website, because- WOW!

No matter if you are riding 50s or LDs, we are going to celebrate this enormous accomplishment with you. You will get a very cool custom award for you and your horse.

Rules are: get a completion with the same horse, same rider, same distance, ALL NINE DAYS of City Of Rocks Pioneer, Top O The World Pioneer, and Autumn Sun Pioneer. That’s the whole challenge!

What Ifs:

Want to level up and switch from LDs to 50s mid-year? As long as you do all 9 days with one horse, you’ll get an award. Something comes up, like you get deathly ill or you break your arm, and someone catch-rides for you? Your incredible horse is going to win something cool if it still completes all 9 days.

So be prepared to bust out some killer horsemanship on some of the most beautiful and epic trails in the northwest. Watch for more information to come as the details mature, but do set your sights on this for next year.

There are no state/regional boundaries for the Idaho Ironhorse. No matter where you are from, if you ride all 9 days, you get some really cool custom awards, and free entries for the following year at all 3 rides.

Have a great winter, and we will see you on the trails.

27-Year-Old PL Mercury Completes Third 100-Mile Endurance Ride of 2018

Thehorse.com - Full Article

After a 2018 campaign that included three difficult 100-mile rides, along with a couple of 50-mile rides, Merc’s owner and rider Claire Godwin, DVM, said he’s still in good condition.

Posted by Marsha Hayes | Oct 15, 2018

PL Mercury, a 27-year-old Arabian gelding, and owner Claire Godwin, DVM, completed the endurance Triple Crown late last month when they finished 15th in the 100-mile American Endurance Ride Conference Championship ride held at the Biltmore Estate, in Asheville, North Carolina.

“Merc” successfully completed three 100-mile rides this year—the 100-mile Old Dominion Ride, which took place in Virginia in June, the 100-mile Tevis Cup in July, when he became the oldest horse to complete the challenging ride through the California mountains, and the Biltmore Estate ride...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/161750/27-year-old-pl-mercury-completes-third-100-mile-endurance-ride-of-2018/

Saturday, October 13, 2018

AERC considers suspending its International Affiliate Status with USEF

by Steph Teeter
Endurance.Net

AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) has historically fulfilled the contractual role of International Affiliate to USEF (United States Equestrian Federation). However a motion from the Executive Committee of AERC will be considered during a November conference call which states: “AERC to suspend the AERC/USEF endurance affiliate agreement effective 12/1/18” .

The justification for this motion includes a lack of response from USEF to consider a request to suspend funding for non-USA FEI (International Equestrian Federation) events. Additionally, the AERC has recently received many letters from its membership requesting AERC to end it’s direct association with USEF due to the differences in how the sport of endurance is conducted internationally, relative to AERC’s original concept of the sport. The FEI emphasis on competition, the perceived lack of adequate consideration for horse welfare, the presence of substantial material and monetary prizes, and the predominance of FEI races being conducted on relatively flat, groomed, courses all contribute to the disconnect between AERC and FEI events.

USEF is recognized by the FEI, and by its International Affiliate Sports as the National Governing Body of equestrian sport in the United States. AERC's withdrawal from its contract with USEF would remove any perceived conflict over AERC's governance of endurance riding.

This action would likely result in the formation or selection of an alternative organization to fulfill the role of USEF’s International Affiliate Sport for endurance racing. However, the motion under consideration would not place any limitations or restrictions on AERC members regarding USEF/FEI participation, either as competitors or event managers.

From the USEF.org website:

USEF Recognized Affiliate Associations play an important role in representing, shaping, and fostering growth within their respective breeds/disciplines. Affiliation with the USEF expands the already important role these organizations play by connecting with all equestrian enthusiasts nationwide and tapping into the ability to reach new audiences. Affiliated associations help the USEF fulfill its mission to provide access to and increase participation in equestrian sports at all levels by ensuring fairness, safety, and enjoyment.

The term Recognized Affiliate Association is reserved for one organization acknowledged by the USEF to represent an International Discipline or the National Breed or Discipline that has a body of rules which has been approved by the USEF Board of Directors for inclusion in the USEF Rule Book. The USEF recognizes only one breed or discipline association for each of these sets of rules. The term International Discipline Association (also referred to as FEI Affiliate) applies to the respective designated representative associations for each of the eight FEI disciplines. Recognized National Affiliate Association (also referred to as Recognized National Affiliate) describes an organization representing a national breed or discipline. For additional information see USEF Bylaw 222.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

2018 October's Endurance Day on Horses in the Morning

HorsesInTheMorning.com - Listen

Oct 9, 2018

On this Endurance episode Karen and Glenn chat with Claire Godwin, DVM about how she keeps her 27 year old horse Mercury happy and healthy; completing three different hundred mile rides in one season. AERC National Champion Holly Corcoran recaps her win and we share our thoughts on the AERC’s open letter to USEF and what it could mean for the future of the sport.

Listen:
http://www.horsesinthemorning.com/future-of-endurance-horse-longevity-aerc-champion-corcoran-endurance-day-for-10-09-18/

Sunday, October 07, 2018

Endurance Youth Spotlight: Leonarado Fuentes

ArabianHorseLife.com - Full Story

September 26, 2018
by Emma Kersey-Doherty

Twelve-year-old Leonarado Fuentes caught up with Arabian Horse Life to tell us a little bit more about his love of Endurance and the special Arabian horses in his world. Leonarado juggles his passion for Endurance riding with National-level Track, as well as competitive Soccer. His love for the sport and his Arabian horses shines through in his interview.

(Emma) Tell us about yourself?

(Leonarado) My name is Leonarado. I am 12 years old and live in Prairieville, La. I do Endurance rides on our Arabians Leo and Raj and experience challenges on the trail which make it fun. You never know what you are going to encounter whether it is a creek crossing, wild animal, or just being out in nature. I love Arabian horses because they truly want to be with you and never quit on the trail.

(Emma) Who are the special Arabian and Half-Arabian horses in your life, and

(Leonarado) Leo is my six-year-old Polish Arabian. He came from Boisvert Farms, which specializes in English Pleasure, but he loves the trails so much more than the arena. He is very sweet to everyone he meets and always gets me safely through every ride. We have done multiple 25-mile Endurance rides and won high vet score recently (this means out of the Top Ten finishing horses, he was the most physically fit disregarding finish time or weight carried). His registered name is Rizing Motion BF...

Read more here:
https://www.arabianhorselife.com/single-post/2018/09/26/Youth-Spotlight-Leonarado-Fuentes

Saturday, October 06, 2018

Absence of a Debacle at the 2018 AERC National Championships


www.endurance.net/international/USA/2018AERCNC

October 5 2018
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

With the looming specter of the previous week's botched World Equestrian Games Endurance race, and the threat of approaching of Hurricane Florence, both within a stone's throw of Biltmore, the American Endurance Ride Conference National Championships went off without a hitch, with kudos to top competition, horsemanship, and sportsmanship.

The Biltmore Estate near Asheville, North Carolina, has been the site of the Biltmore Endurance Rides since 1994. It was the second time the AERC National Championships were run over this course (2012 was the first one). This year's events were held September 20-22.

Cheryl and Stagg Newman have managed the Biltmore rides since 2006, and the trails for this year's National Championships had been test ridden in the May Biltmore ride. Hurricane Florence ultimately cooperated, though it was questionable up to the weekend before the ride.

"The ride site had maybe 2 inches of rain," Cheryl Newman said. "Asheville is a rain shadow, so it got less. We didn't really get the brunt of Florence. We didn't even get that much wind, which was a bit of a surprise.

"The storm was out of here Sunday. By Monday morning we knew we were fine. Monday we sent out the word that yes, we were going to have the ride. 'Come one, come all, we have a nice welcome mat out for you.' And people did come.

"By the time they got there, the event site was quite dry, and by the time the ride rolled around on Thursday for the 50, the trails were in really good shape."


The 50 Mile Championship

In that fine display of horsemanship and sportsmanship, Erin Lemmons and Tuscarora John (aka "TJ"), and Jeremy Reynolds and Anydaynow (aka "P") tied for first place in the 50 mile Championship in a ride time of 5:20.

Erin Lemmons, 32, and her 12-year-old gelding Tuscarora John hauled in from Stephenville, Texas. "I had a plan of the pace I was going to do for all 3 loops," Erin said, "and I stuck to it."

"We'd won the Biltmore 50 in May," Jeremy Reynolds, 38, said of P, his 17-year-old mount, "and I beat a really good horse in a sprint-off. So I knew coming into the Championship, he felt really good training and everything, I knew he was going to be tough to beat."

Both Erin and TJ, and Jeremy and P, were near the front of the pack of 68 starters the entire ride, and on the last loop that pair of riders had a clear lead and obviously still had strong horses.

Jeremy said, "When it came down to just Erin and me, I offered, would you like to tie, these horses have worked really hard. We're not going to go slow the last loop, but there's no point taking extra risks. And she agreed, so we rode together and tied."

Erin said, "At the last vet check, my sister, my brother-in-law, my mom and dad were all saying, omigosh, he looks really good, he's still full of energy, head up, ears up, looking around, like we're not done yet, so they said, don't do anything stupid, of course!

"Jeremy's horse P looked pretty good. And we just kind of traded off. He led a little bit, I led a little bit, we rode together on some two-tracks. I mean, it was perfect. Both horses truly deserved to win."

Heather Reynolds summed up the ride with a bit of humor, "We were 45 minutes away from the WEG course. The weather was similar and the trail more technical. The completion rate was stellar. Without stopping and restarting the ride and without canceling the ride, there was a 74% completion rate for the championship 50 mile ride (44 starters and 28 finishers) and there were 22 finishers of the 24 starters on the Open 50."

Jeremy and Erin also tied for top Lightweights; 3rd place Alisija Zabavska and Hidden Assetts were first Featherweight; first Middleweight was 7th place Jane Rodrigue on Al Shama Shaazon; first heavyweight was 18th place Don Meuten on FYF Wolverine; first Junior was 13th place Madeline Isaacs on Shasta.

Anydaynow is by Patriot Missle (by Wiking) out of Annatiki, by SX Champion. He was bred by CreRun Farm and is owned by Barbara Hershberger, from Pennsylvania. Anydaynow has competed for 10 seasons with a record of 23 finishes in 32 starts and 1195 miles. Barbara competed on him for his first 8 seasons; both Heather and Jeremy, from Dunellon, Florida, have ridden him the last two.

"He's the first horse that Heather and I sold when we decided to become professional horsemen," Jeremy said. "We never owned him; he came back to us a few times during his career for training, when Barbara wanted us to work on him."

Tuscarora John, by Line Dancer out of Fawora, by Fawor, was bred by Jane Teutsch of Texas. Erin had previously looked at TJ as a 4 or 5-year-old. "We were kind of new to endurance at the time, and didn't know a good thing when we saw one. We really wanted him, but Jane wanted a little more money than we had budgeted, and we weren't sure what to pay for a good endurance horse. So we did pass."

However, Erin kept an eye out for TJ. Former USA Endurance Chef d'Equipe Emmett Ross had bought TJ and was training him but eventually decided to sell him. When Erin found out, she wanted to try him out again.

"November of 2015, Emmett brought him and another horse out. I rode the other horse first, because Emmett was saying TJ could be a little bit of a handful. I said, 'Really! that sounds like my kind of horse!' But i got on the other horse first. We rode a few miles, then we traded.

"And I just instantly fell in love. I didn't care what issues we had to work through, as far as recoveries. It was just - this horse loves to go, loves his job, and is a dream to ride. So I had to have him!"

TJ not only tied for first place in the 50-mile Championship; he also took Best Condtion. TJ is a first place and Best Condition machine, since Erin began riding him in 2016. (Previous to that, the gelding finished 4 out of 4 starts). Together they've completed 10 of 12 starts, with 8 first places, 2 second places, and 10 Best Conditions.

"TJ’s first career was a track horse," Erin said. "He is a stakes winner!" That's likely where his competitive nature comes from. "He's an amazing horse. He's really competitive. That's why I really enjoy riding him!"


The 100 Mile Championship

Holly Corcoran, 54, from Pennsylvania, had no idea she was more than 2 hours ahead of the nearest competitor when she and Poete crossed the finish line in the 100 mile Championship in a ride time of 12:26.47.

"I felt incredibly focused. I didn't know anything else that was going on around me. I knew I was an hour ahead at some point in time, but I didn't even know I was 2 hours ahead of anyone when I finished," Holly said.

Coming into the ride, Holly had good expectations of her 11-year-old gelding. "I had ridden the Bitlmore 100 in the spring [finishing 4th and earning Best Condition], and I was hoping to decrease my time. But then we dealt with high heat and humidity this time around." They still beat their previous time, by 8 minutes.

And Holly cleverly used a good ride strategy. "His ego gets fed by passing horses, so we actually started 10-15 minutes behind, nowhere near the start, and ended up passing just about everybody and coming within 6 minutes of the front runners. And we stayed there the rest of the ride."

Holly and Poete, and Meg Sleeper and Syrocco Cadence rode together from loop 2 onward. "Meg is a fierce competitor, so she really kept me on my toes to make sure that my turnaround and recoveries were right on target. We were basically head to head, finishing within a minute or so of each other for the pulse times, and heading out through the 5th loop. And at that vet check, they found some lameness on Meg's horse so she was pulled. Then I continued the last loop alone.

"I had outstanding crew. And without them, I don't think I would have been able to have the performance I did, because it did get hot and humid, and they kept Poete cool. He was eating like a machine. Toward the end of the holds, he was quickly into the 40's [pulse rate] and staying at a good low rate before we were ready to go out, which I think made a big difference for him being able to keep up the steady pace during the ride."

Poete also took Best Condition, something he's done in all 3 of his starts this year. The gelding now has a record of 18 finishes in 22 starts and 1205 AERC miles and 5 Best Conditions over 7 seasons.

By Banjo de Falgas out of Poetikka, by Statistic, Poete was bred by Tom and Holly Sayvetz of Asgard Arabians in West Virginia. Holly picked him us as a 4-year-old and started him under saddle.

"I'm really lucky because I think the Asgards have the athleticism and genetics that they have naturally low heart rates and they have quick recoveries."

Holly actually has 5 Asgard Arabians, including Poetrie, a 7-year-old 3/4 sister to Poete, who finished 10th in Thursday's 50-mile Championship. "Asgards are like potato chips. You can't have just one!"

Holly and Poete were first Lightweight; Marcia Weilbach and Zanthus Fury tied for 2nd place and first Featherweight with Wendy Mancini and Sterling; 16th place Cheryl Van Deusen and Ebs Regal Majjaan was first Middleweight; 9th place Guy Worthington and PA Hi-Spirit was first Heavyweight.

33 started the 100-mile Championship and 16 finished. Worth noting was the incomparable 78-year-old Jan Worthington (with over 32,000 AERC miles), who rode with her son Guy and finished 8th aboard Dimitri KS; and Claire Godwin and 27-year-old incomparable PL Mercury finished 15th, for his third 100-mile completion of the year (including Tevis and Old Dominion!), and his 17th 100 overall.


A Smooth National Championship

Ride manager Cheryl Newman summed up the ride.

"Well… nobody's going to really write paeans of praise to the heat and humidity. Particularly on Saturday for the 100 - let's say it was seriously humid that night.

"But overall, in the scheme of things it was a very smooth ride. There were minimal glitches and the riders all came with a very positive attitude and seemed to be very pleased with the ride itself, and how the trails presented themselves.

"They came ready to be pleased, and they had a good time."

More ride info at:
www.endurance.net/international/USA/2018AERCNC

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

AERC Announces International Endurance Equine Excellence Award

October 2, 2018

The American Endurance Ride Conference is pleased to announce its first-ever International Endurance Equine Excellence Award. 

Nominations are now open for this award, designed to recognize the best horses from around the world in overall achievement. AERC, in seeking to emphasize longevity as an essential ingredient to success, requires that the nominated horse have a minimum of eight years of endurance competition. The award's minimum mileage requirement is 2500 miles/4000 km in rides of 50 miles/80 km or longer. 

The top horses will be named at the AERC convention's national award ceremony on March 9, 2019, in Reno, Nevada. Winning horses will receive a custom-embroidered horse blanket and owners will receive a custom trophy. Awards will be mailed to nominators if they can not present at the AERC convention. 

"The purpose of this award is recognize gifted endurance athletes/horses that have consistently and reliably performed at a high level for many years," said Past AERC President Michael Campbell of Texas. "Typically a single owner/rider has managed the horse's conditioning and nurtured the horse's attitude in a way that exemplifies the relationship between horse and rider typical of traditional endurance rides over difficult trails and terrain." 

By reaching out beyond the USA and Canada, the nonprofit organization, founded in the U.S. in 1972, hopes to acknowledge those riders and horse owners around the world who share in AERC's core principles. 

"AERC hopes this award will assist in a return to traditional endurance riding values which emphasize the partnership between a horse and rider team over a challenging trail as opposed to current trends toward racing that emphasize speed over flat courses with little concern for the overall well-being of the horse," said Campbell. 

"AERC hopes to receive nominations from all around the world where riders value their horses and the original goals of endurance riding which emphasize 'to finish is to win'," said Campbell. 

Nominations are due by December 30, 2018. 

Award requirements: https://aerc.org/static/2018ExcellenceAward.aspx 

Online application form: https://aerc.org/static/2018ExcellenceAward.aspx 

If you have any questions, please contact the AERC office: office@aerc.org

Monday, October 01, 2018

#Enough is Enough!

EnduranceIntrospection.com

by Patti Stedman
October 1 2018

Letter sent this morning to AERC Board of Directors. If you are a member and you agree with the sentiments in this letter and the members who signed it, it is not enough to hit “like” on Facebook, or make a comment saying you agree, or send me a note saying you agree wholeheartedly.

You must email your AERC Board of Directors (here’s the link to do so: Link to email AERC BoD ), provide them with your AERC membership number, the service you provide to the organization (Ride Manager, Veterinarian, Committee Member, Ride Volunteer, Trail Volunteer), and include “Enough is Enough!” in the subject line of your email. Feel free to cut and paste the contents of the letter if you like.

E-mail sent 10/1/2018:

Dear AERC BoD Members, Kathleen and Troy:

Several long-time AERC members drafted a letter outlining our disenchantment with USEF/FEI international endurance. We sent the letter to a number of AERC members who have contributed a great deal to the organization and who we believed would want to join us as signatories. We were not surprised at the overwhelming positive response. Most replied “YES” or “add me.” We believe the majority of AERC members share the sentiments expressed here.

We’ve added Troy to this distribution to request publication of the letter in the next issue of Endurance News, in an attempt to reach AERC members who do not frequent social media or the internet.

We understand that the Executive Committee and AERC-I Committee have sent a letter to USEF, requesting changes.

Unfortunately, we have all been witness to the previous letters, and the lack of substantial response from USEF/FEI. It is time that we step away; these are not our egregious issues to fix.

Let’s determine our own destiny and show our members as well as the world that we have had enough and will no longer support USEF/FEI endurance until they can improve and enforce their rules.

Thank you.

***

September 27, 2018

To the AERC Board of Directors:

Many of us within AERC recall with pride when endurance became an international-level sport. This evolution, however, has resulted in changes we can no longer tolerate or support. We have observed with growing alarm years of corruption, egregious issues regarding horse welfare, attempts to influence through example, pleas to stay at the table, and letters, motions and new rules to address the problems to no avail. We have lost confidence in these efforts to produce real change on the actual field of play. The issues associated with international endurance continue growing within our sport. High emotions are dividing us, and the dilemma is compromising the sport we love.

The recent World Endurance Games, held on American soil, were not officially sanctioned by AERC, but relied on the support of many of our riders, horses, veterinarians, and members. Many sensed a coming disaster but had no power to prevent it. AERC sent a letter to USEF, expressing concern about a “level playing field.” Connie Caudill, a member of the AERC Board of Directors, initiated a Change.org petition demanding FEI make changes to tangibly ensure equine welfare. That petition has garnered well over 5,000 signatures.

Despite the fact that the Tryon WEG was not AERC-sanctioned, our sport will forever be tarnished by this event. The competition was mired with avoidable controversy and competitors were denied a level field of play.

The WEG is the final catalyst after years of poisonous problems within USEF and FEI regarding international endurance. It is time for decisive and bold leadership from AERC. We must stand alongside other National Federations equally dismayed by the corruption of our sport and decisively shout, “ENOUGH.”

We urge the AERC Board of Directors to respectfully decline executing the affiliate endurance organization contract/agreement with USEF until such time as FEI has made significant and tangible changes to enact and enforce rules consistently, without favoritism or undue influence by sponsors. We ask that international endurance cease to be run over courses allowing unfettered speed demanding few exceptional skills. Lead us in our return to more tempered, elite competitions over challenging, technical terrain that tests the finest in horsemanship, athleticism and strategy.

There is much that can be done to improve our sport in the USA and Canada as AERC. Let us focus on using our voice and actions to demonstrate to the world that we are different from what they saw at WEG. The AERC National Championship, just a week later, showed how elite events can and should be run.

We hope other National Federations will see AERC as a leader true to the foundation of our sport and invite them to work with us in building a new vision of international riding, following in the footsteps of the Young Rider International Exchange Program, without the taint of USEF or FEI involvement.

Our AERC members and horses deserve a sport truly modeled after our motto, To Finish Is To Win. We call upon you to lead us forward out of the mire and into a future true to our integrity.

Sincerely (listed alphabetically),

Stan Alkemade, 8475, NE Region, Veterinarian, Former FEI Vet, Former Team Canada/East Veterinarian

Nina Bomar, 4165, PS Region

Elysa Braunstein, VMD, M31822, PS Region, Veterinarian

Kathy Broaddus, 11416, NE Region, Veterinarian

Dianna Chapek, 4093, W Region, Former Director, Pard’ners Award

Cindy Collins, 176, MT Region, Former Director, Ride Manager, WY Trails Advocate

Diane Connolly, M31597, NE Region, Ride Manager

Crockett Dumas, 748, MT Region, Former Director (22 years)/AERC President, Started Trails Committee (1983), HOF Person

Steve Downs, M38411, PS Region

Randy Eiland, 39, SW Region, Former Director/AERC President, Former Chair RM, Sponsorship, Rules and Sanctioning Committees

Denny Emerson, M19095, SE Region

Dawn Engle-Hilliard, M36420, NE Region, Ride Volunteer

Ruth Ferland, M33457, NE Region, Ride Manager, NH Trails Advocate

Kerry Greear, M33578, MT Region, Former Ride Manager, Former Co-Chair Education Committee, AERC Education Committee

Susan Garlinghouse, DVM, 6747, W Region, Vet Committee, Former DAL and Education Committee Chair, Volunteer Service Award

Becky Glaser, 6542, W Region, Former USEF Selector, Former Junior Committee

Lynne Glazer, 14580, PS Region, Former Ride Manager, Clinic Organizer

Claire Godwin, DVM, 9671, NE Ride Manager

Laura Hayes, 2741, MT Region, Former Director/VP, Former Chair Welfare of the Horse Committee, Ride Manager

Bri Henderson, DVM, M30691, NE Region, Veterinarian

Elisabet Hiatt, 5022, W Region, Ride Manager

Dean Hilliard, M37752, NE Region, Ride Volunteer

Blaine Jack, M36339, NE Region, Ride Manager

Pamela Karner, M33003, NE Region, Ride Manager, Veterinarian, FEI PTV

Jamie Kerr, DVM, 7841, W Region, Veterinarian, Former FEI Veterianarian, Former Vet Committee

Jan Mutchler, 17308, SW Region, Ride Manager

Lani Newcomb, 658, NE Region, Veterinarian, Old Dominion BoD, Ride Manager

Tom Noll, M30552, NW Region, Former Director

Lori Oleson, 1418, W Region, Ride Manager

Taylor Pashong-Walck, M22483, SW Region, Ride/Asst Manager

Pam Peace, 5822, W Region, Ride Manager

Patti Pizzo, 9968, NE Region, Former Director, Ride Manager

Jennifer Poling, M32258, NE Region, Decade Ride Manager, Former AERC-I Zone Rep, WV Trails Advocate

Naomi Preston, 4096, Former P&G Committee, Owner: HOF Horse

Carla Richardson, M34774, MT Region, Former Director, Welfare of the Horse Committee

Susie Schomburg, 6505, MT Region, Former Director (10+ years), RM Committee, Ride Manager (28 years), MRER President

Cindy Simcox, 9144, MT Region, Ride Manager

Patti Stedman, M20888, NE Region, Former Director and Chair of Ride Managers & Education Committees

Roger Taylor, 1496, SW Region, Former Director/Treasurer, HOF Person, Ride Manager

Kevin Waters, 6784, MT Region, Committee Member, Former Director

Bruce Weary, DC, 4160, SW Region, Former Director, Member of Welfare of the Horse, Education, P&G and Veterinary Committees

Barbara White, 2446, W Region, Committee Member

Monday, September 24, 2018

Holly Corcoran and Poete win AERC National Championship 100

September 24 2018

At the AERC National Championships in North Carolina on Saturday, Holly Corcoran and Poete won the 100-mile ride in a ride time of 12:26.47, more than 2 hours ahead of their nearest competitor. Pete also won the Best Condition and High Vet Score award, and Holly was First Lightweight.

Second was Marcia Weilbach and Zanthus Fury in 14:36 (First Featherweight), with Wendy Mancini and Sterling third in 14:36.50.

First Heavyweight, finishing ninth, was Guy Worthington aboard PA Hi-Spirit, in 15:50.55, Guy rode with his mom, 78-year-old Jan Worthington, riding Dimitri KS into eighth place.

First Middleweight was 16th place (and turtle) Cheryl Van Deusen, riding Ebs Regal Majjaan, in 19:25.13.

Claire Godwin rode PL Mercury to a 15th place finish in 17:44.39. The incomparable, 27-year-old "Merc" finished his third 100 miler of the year (including Old Dominion and Tevis), and his 17th 100 overall! The gelding is now just shy of 6000 miles.

33 started the ride and 16 finished.

Lemmons and Reynolds Tie for Win in AERC National Championship 50

September 24 2018

In a nice display of horsemanship and sportsmanship, Erin Lemmons and Jeremy Reynolds tied for first place in the weekend's AERC National Championships, held in Biltmore, North Carolina.

Lemmons rode Tuscarora John and Reynolds rode Anydaynow,, finishing in 5:20. Both were also First Lightweight.

Third place and First Featherweight was Alisija Zabavska and Hidden Assets in a ride time of 5:25.

First Middleweight, finishing in 6:15, was Jane Rodriguez and Al Shama Shaazon. First Junior was Madeline Issacs and Shasta in 6:47. First Heavyweight was Don Meuten and FYF Wolverine in 7:13.

One can't help comparing last week's nearby World Equestrian Games Endurance fiasco to this well-run (by ride managers Stagg and Cheryl Newman) AERC National Championships event. Heather Reynolds commented with a bit of humor, "We were :45 mins away from the WEG course. The weather was similar and the trail more technical. The completion rate was stellar. Without stopping and restarting the ride and without canceling the ride, there was a 74% completion rate for the championship 50 mile ride and there were 22 finishers of the 24 starters on the Open 50."

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Nebraska Endurance Riding at Indian Cave State Park

Equitrekking.com - Full Article

September 14 2018

Indian Cave State Park welcomes the Nebraska Endurance and Competitive Trail Ride Association every fall.


Story and photos by Jenny Wheatley/NEBRASKAland Magazine

“This story was originally published in the October 2015 issue of NEBRASKAland Magazine.”

Competitive trail riders are one of the most eclectic groups of equestrians on the planet. From Wranglers to shorts to neon-colored breeches; from draft crosses to Arabians to sure-footed mules and ponies – riders and mounts of all disciplines and breeds can be found at competitive trail rides (CTRs), an equestrian sport that tests horse and rider skills and endurance.

Indian Cave State Park near Shubert is the location of one CTR, put on by the Nebraska Endurance and Competitive Trail Riding Association (NECTRA), which is sanctioned by the national organization, the North American Trail Ride Conference (NATRC). The Nebraska club was founded in 1974, and they have been returning to Indian Cave to ride for nearly four decades, making it the oldest CTR in the nation. Every fall, NATRC riders come to compete over the same set of winding trails – some of which are not open to the public – that offer views of the Missouri River from the park’s many hills and bluffs...

Read more here:
https://equitrekking.com/articles/entry/nebraska-endurance-riding-at-indian-cave-state-park

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

2018 WEG Show Special Episode – Tevis Winner Heather Reynolds on the Canceled Endurance Race


HorseRadioNetwork.com - Listen

Sep 18, 2018

Three time Tevis winner and one of the United States top Endurance riders Heather Reynolds joins me to tell us about the aborted Endurance Ride at WEG from her perspective. She had some horses in the race and was crewing there. Heather has been a regular guest on our shows for years and she has been gracious enough to join us to share her perspective. We are presenting the facts as she saw them that day. If you are hoping for speculation and the pointing of fingers, I am afraid you will be disappointed. But, she does set straight some of the rumors that were floating around. Listen in...

Monday, September 17, 2018

Cukjati and Melika Kamaal Win Virginia City 100; Schork and VA Blizzard of Oz Take B.C.

September 17 2018
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

In a tight finish of one of the USA's premiere 100-mile endurance rides, the Virginia City 100, Jacob Cukjati and Melika Kamaal nipped Christoph Schork and VA Blizzard of Oz at the graveyard finish line in the dark. Ride time for the 100 miles was 13:08. It was the first ride in the VC 100 for Cukjati, from North San Juan, California.

It was also Schork's first ride in the VC 100, which is pretty amazing, since AERC winningest rider has conquered many rides in his long storied career, including a win in the recent Gobi Desert Cup in Mongolia.

Finishing third 26 minutes later were Suzanne Ford Huff and SD Espressa for Huff's 7th VC buckle. Fourth was Carla Lakenbrink aboard Schork's GE Danex in 14:01. Carla was on just a 2-week visit from Germany, after having talked Christoph into driving across country again, from Moab to Nevada (he'd just been to Tevis 6 weeks earlier) for the VC 100. It was her first VC 100.

Ann Hall and HCC Zara RR finishing 5th in 14:14, for Ann's 8th VC buckle. Andrew Gerhard, finishing 17th on TSF Fools Gold at 2:00 AM in a ride time of 17:40, earned his 10th VC buckle.

47 riders started this 51st anniversary ride, with 33 finishing, a finish percentage of 70.2%. Five Juniors also completed the ride.

More info on the Virginia City 100 and the Nevada All-State Trail Riders can be seen at:
http://nastr.org/

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Horsemen retracing Trail of Tears for charity

Tahlequahdailypress.com - Full Article

By Sheri Gourd sgourd@tahlequahdailypress.com
September 13 2018

Members of Ride for Missions set out from Tahlequah on their horses Monday morning on their trip along the Trail of Tears to Cherokee, North Carolina.

Ride for Missions is a series of endurance-style horse rides used to raise awareness and funds for mission work in various parts of the world.

"We're doing great," said Len Crow, a pastor from Orillia, Ontario, Canada. "By the end of Wednesday, we should be 50 miles outside Tahlequah."

This is Crow's eighth long-distance ride. His previous rides have been to benefit people in other countries, so Crow decided to raise awareness and funds for missions on two reservations.

The current two month, 900-plus-mile ride will benefit ministries with the White Mountain Apache in Arizona and the Crow Reservation in Montana. Crow hopes to raise $30,000 for each...

Read more here:
http://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/community/faith/horsemen-retracing-trail-of-tears-for-charity/article_0d39edb7-15ca-51fc-b00f-516226d93646.html

Monday, September 03, 2018

Antidepressant residues in dumped waste led to endurance horse’s failed drug test

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

September 3, 2018
Horsetalk.co.nz

Environmental contamination with an antidepressant was behind minute traces of the drug being found in an endurance horse at a Canadian ride.

The FEI Tribunal found that the United States-registered rider Nicki Meuten bore no fault or negligence for the drug being in her horse’s system during a CSI3* 160km ride at Coates Creek, Canada, on July 2 last year.

Meuten competed on FYF Dutch in the race.

Her mount was selected for drug testing and FYF Dutch was positive for O-Desmethyl Venlafaxine, an anti-depressant used for treating depression and anxiety. It is classified as a banned substance under the FEI’s anti-doping rules.

Meuten was told of the positive test on October 16 last year, with provisional suspensions imposed on the horse and rider.

On May 18 this year, a preliminary hearing panel decided to lift Meuten’s suspension after considering written submissions and documents from her which indicated inadvertent environmental contamination as the likely source...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2018/09/03/antidepressant-residues-waste-horse-drug-test/

Saturday, September 01, 2018

Endurance Horse Podcast - Episode 10


Endurance Horse Podcast - Listen

TEVIS 2018 Part 2: Episode 10 ENDURANCE HORSE PODCAST Jenny Chandler ERIN GLASSMAN Daryl Owen DARICE WHITE Melanie Martin

is being published the 30th of August 2018

This is the second of three espisodes with the featured audio files being those from Tevis.



The song at the begining is:

Good Life by Love & The Outcome

The song is avaialbe on on iTunes.



I hope you enjoy the show notes for links to websites and also to blogs!



If you like the podcast, please find us also on our Facebook group where we share more stories and photos about our horses and our rides:

Endurance Horse Podcast on Facebook

Email your audio stories to endurancehorsepodcast@gmail.com

Ideally the files should be from two to 7 minutes in length.

The Endurance Horse Podcast is sponsored by www.christinahyke.com

WEG Endurance Course Approved

M.Tryondailbulletin.com - Full Article

by Leah Justice
August 30 2018

USDA inspected and approved the course

MILL SPRING - The endurance race at the World Equestrian Games is on.

After not knowing last week if the endurance course would be approved, the United States Department of Agriculture inspected and approved the course Tuesday...

Read more here:
https://m.tryondailybulletin.com/2018/08/30/weg-endurance-course-approved/

Workers Battle 24-7 to Get Tryon Ready on Time

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

August 30, 2018 | Comments
by: Pippa Cuckson

Workers are battling round the clock in “multiple shifts” to get Tryon International Equestrian Centre (TIEC) serviceable on time for the World Equestrian Games, with the first intake of horses is due at Greenville Spartanburg airport on September 2nd.

In an astonishing “first” for a WEG, operations director Sharon Decker briefed local media last week with an assurance the Games were still on, following months of speculation about poor ticket sales, acres of unfinished facilities, and a rumor that the FEI had even considered re-locating some disciplines to other venues.

In a video interview posted at the beginning of August, Mark Bellissimo, the Managing Partner of Tryon Equestrian Partners, stood in the facility’s international pavilion that is to be the three story hub of WEG hospitality events. With the opening ceremonies one month away, the building had no walls and the view outside to WEG’s main outdoor arena that is to seat 20,000 was a blur of red clay construction...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/horse-news/battle-get-tryon-ready/

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Endurance Horse Podcast - Episode 9

EnduranceHorsePodcast - Listen

TEVIS 2018 PART 1: EPISODE 9 ERIN GLASSMAN - JENNY CHANDLER WHITNEY WEST SARAH RINNE KAREN CHATON TENNESSEE LANE

August 29th, 2018

Tevis 2018 Part 1 Episode 9 of the Endurance Horse Podcast

is being published the 29th of August 2018

This is one of two espisodes with the featured audio files being those from Tevis.

The song towards the end is by Mary Ann Kennedy.

Mary Ann gave us permission to share her songs on the podcast. Mary Ann's songs are sold on iTunes. Please visit her site Mary Ann Kennedy she caters to the equine world.

Right after the song by Mary Ann Kennedy you will hear my Ride Report with my special friend, Tara Leroy where we try out some new phone tech to record a phone call between the two of us. Of course we had to wait until we had a quiet moment after chores were done (though quite honestly, probably not dishes), kids were to bed and husbands tucked in bed too.

We had a chance to remember the ride we had just a few short weeks ago at the Louise Riedel Memorial Bra Buster ride. The story goes that something had been lost on the trail; Louise took her bra off to mark the spot where it had been lost. Though I never knew Louise; I know she was a horsewoman with over 17,000 AERC miles and she is sorely missed by her friends who host this ride in her honor.

It seems so fitting that this ride- that is in memory of a friendship- should be the ride first ride that Tara & I completed together.

Another bit of trivia- both Jr and Mariah were the first horses that Tara or I had bred. Very different horses; though still just one of the many things that made Bra Buster 2018 special to both of us. Jr is 15 and Mariah is 14. Jr (Mandate for Gold) is a Georgian Grande (Saddlebred x Belgian draft) and Mariah Moment is Anglo-Arabian (TB x Arabian). Yes, we were quite the odd pair trotting down the trails!

I hope you enjoy the show notes for links to websites and also to blogs!...

More at
https://endurancehorsepodcast.podbean.com/e/tevis-2018-part-1-episode-9-erin-glassman-jenny-chandler-whitney-west-sarah-rinne-karen-chaton-tennessee-lane/

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

South Dakota: Adventures on the trail: Rachel Zander competes in endurance rides

TheDickinsonPress.com - Full Article

By Linda Sailer on Aug 27, 2018

Rachel Zander of Dickinson never knows what to expect when she sets out on an equestrian endurance ride of 25 or even 100 miles in a single day.

The Ft. Meade Remount Ride in South Dakota on Aug. 18-19 is an example of the unexpected. “I love the Black Hills. We had a great day even with the rain and hail. I rode GZ (Golly Zands) in the 50 on Saturday, then we got rained out so we didn’t get to ride on Sunday,” she said.

She went on to thank organizer Michele Seaman for organizing the ride and to Dante LaPierre, her friend from Halliday, who joined in the ride.

Zander, 28, is the daughter of Vicki and Keith Zander of Dickinson and currently works as a salesperson for Pepsi.

As a member of the American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC), she considers riding as a as a hobby, and as an outlet for her love of animals...

Read more here:
https://www.thedickinsonpress.com/lifestyle/family/4491064-adventures-trail-rachel-zander-competes-endurance-rides

Saturday, August 25, 2018

WARHorses’ Interview with endurance rider Joyce Sousa and LV Integrity

Womenofageridinghorses.com - Full Interview

He was tied alongside a trailer at an endurance ride, offered for sale. Covered with sweat, he frantically paced back and forth along on the tie. His selling points was singular and not impressive – he bucked off every person who ever tried to ride him. By the end of the day, there were no takers. But she saw something no one else saw, the utter despair in his eyes. She knew this horse was at the end of his rope and she wanted to help him. She bought him on the spot. It seemed crazy at the time but turned out to be one of the best decisions of Joyce Sousa’s life.

Joyce Sousa was already an accomplished endurance rider when she made that fateful purchase in 1998. Joyce and her husband, Dennis, started competing in endurance in 1985. In 1998, her endurance horse was a big chestnut gelding, Jim Bob. Jim Bob would become Joyce’s first American Endurance Race Conference (AERC) Hall of Fame horse in 2005 with over 9,000 race miles. She could never have imagined at the time, that her $1,850 “crazy” purchase would yield another Hall of Famer and more, so much more.

His name is LV Integrity but the Sousas just call him Ritz. In 1998, he was a misunderstood 6-year-old Arabian that no one wanted. He retires this year an endurance champion, his career highlight with achievements few horses have ever accomplished.

WH: What were your plans once you bought Ritz home?


JS: The first morning started with Ritz charging me. I yelled and threw brushes at him and shooed him into a corner. He just stared at me. I approached him and started brushing him, he was shaking but did not move. He didn’t know what else to do but stand still and stare. We did this every day for three weeks. Then I sent him to a trainer friend, Rex Minton.

Rex started by simply saddling him then walking outside the arena. Ritz would buck and buck until he was tired. As soon as he stopped bucking, Rex removed the saddle and the day’s lesson was over. The first six days were all the same; saddle on, buck until tired, saddle off. My first report from Rex was simply, “this horse can buck”.

On the seventh day, Rex saddled Ritz but there was no reaction. He mounted, and the two walked quietly for a few minutes, lesson over. Three weeks later, Rex phoned with another report, “Joyce, I think you’ve got a horse...”

Read more here:
https://womenofageridinghorses.com/training/features/warhorses-interview-with-endurance-rider-joyce-sousa-and-lv-integrity/

Friday, August 24, 2018

AERC International Youth Exchange!

Last call. Get the applications completed by the end of August. 

Attention young riders between the ages of 13 and 20. We are in the early planning stages of the AERC International Youth Exchange. We will be taking 4 young riders to a safe foreign country in 2019 to ride in a 50 mile endurance ride on borrowed horses. (Not FEI) We will make final plans on the destination soon. On recent trip 4 young riders went to Australia for a trip of a lifetime and now here is the opportunity you will not want to miss the chance to be selected. Most of the travel funds have been raised at this time.This is an educational and a fun adventure! 

Qualifications in order to apply: 
1. Must have 500 AERC endurance miles 
2. Must have ridden more than one horse in competition 

Online application: https://aerc.org/2019exchange

This is still a pilot program of AERC. The funding has been obtained from the Gator Run Benefit rides, veterinarians who have worked these rides, silent auctions and also sponsors. If anyone would like to help out with funding please contact either the AERC Office or Connie Burns-Caudill. Looking forward to another exciting trip with our young riders. If you can't click on the link, call the AERC office and they will e-mail you the application. If you have already applied, I have it, no need to worry.

Saturday, August 18, 2018

Long way back: From ‘Crawl of Grit’ to Tevis Cup, equestrian’s dream comes full circle

TheUnion.com - Full Article

Brian Hamilton
August 17, 2018

Crossing the finish line after the overnight horse ride from Truckee to Auburn, she wasn't just arriving at the race's end.

She had landed on the doorstep of her dream.

And the emotional release spilled out through tears, laughter and unbridled joy that spread a smile wide across her face.

Susannah Jones and her Arabian, Diablo Maj, had conquered the Tevis Cup. But the journey they'd completed extended far beyond the 100 miles they'd just covered.

Horse and rider set out that 2012 morning for their first endurance ride training, something Susannah said she'd wanted to do since first seeing the Tevis Cup.

But after a long ride out from camp, they came to a cattle grate blocking their path. They looked for an alternate route when Maj got tangled up in barbed wire and brought them both to the ground and rolling down a rocky embankment, the twisting barbed wire tearing at their flesh as their bodies were banged bloody, bruised and broken.

All alone on a 9,000 acre ranch in the middle of nowhere — an area known as the Renner Valley in the "Oregon Outback" — she knew she had to get help.

So Susannah, who turns 64 next month, set off on what she calls "The Crawl of Grit."

"We had our tendons severed at the knees and I had broken mine (kneecap) along with many other injuries," she said. "I somehow dragged myself for eight miles in desert heat … It was sheer willpower, man, because I was bleeding all over...

Read more here:
https://www.theunion.com/opinion/long-way-back-nevada-county-residents-crawl-of-grit-ends-in-success/

Tevis Cup: Steinauer woman competes in mountainous horse-riding competition

BeatriceDailySun.com - Full Article

Christina Lyons Daily Sun staff
Aug 17, 2018

Sarah Rinne has wanted to ride in the Tevis Cup Endurance Ride since she was 9 or 10 years old.

“...And thirty years later, it finally happened,” said Rinne, who is from Steinauer.

Rinne was among one of the 42 percent that finished on July 29, 2018, in the horse-riding competition. Riding Silver Valley Tate, Rinne finished in 23 hours and 47 minutes, earning a coveted belt buckle.

The Tevis Cup Endurance Ride has been held every year since 1955 in northern California on the Western States Trail in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. It's a race of 100 miles of trail in 24 hours and is touted as one of the toughest endurance rides in the world.

Tate is a gaited Morgan owned by Dwight and Mary Hanson of Ithaca, Nebraska. He is 16.1 hands tall and 9 years old...

Read more here:
https://beatricedailysun.com/news/local/steinauer-woman-competes-in-mountainous-horse-riding-competition/article_ce805da1-7211-5a04-a62a-b3c96259b3f6.html

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Huntington County resident, horse earn rare Century Club accolade

HuntingtonCountyTab.com - Full Article

By Rebecca Sandlin - Monday, August 13, 2018

The bond between horse and rider can be close, but when it encompasses a hundred years it is something special. One Huntington County resident, Janet Kirkpatrick and her Arabian steed, HA HI Fire, have made the century mark together in age.

Kirkpatrick, of Andrews, turned 80 years old on April 11, and her horse, known as Booker, is now 20. That’s a combination that few horses and riders have reached in the American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC), of which Kirkpatrick is a member. The organization, which boasts about 5,000 members, honors rider and equine teams who earn national recognition when they complete a ride once their ages total 100 or more. It’s a pretty big honor, says Kyra DeMartini, of AERC.

“We only have nine Century Club members that we’re aware of,” DeMartini says. “It’s very prestigious, because it demonstrates the longevity of their equine and their partnership with their equine.”

Kirkpatrick and Booker will be featured in the AERC’s monthly news publication in September, and she will receive a certificate recognizing the team as part of the Century Club...

Read more here:
http://www.huntingtoncountytab.com/community/49656/huntington-county-resident-horse-earn-rare-century-club-accolade

Monday, August 13, 2018

2018 August's Endurance Day on Horses in the Morning


Horseradionetwork.com - Listen

08-09-2016 – ENDURANCE DAY – TEVIS ADVENTURES WITH DARICE, WAYNE’S TAHOE RIM RIDE, KAREN’S CREW CONUNDRUM
Aug 10, 2016

On today’s Endurance Episode features reports on the Olympics, Mongol Derby and of course Tevis Cup with Darice Whyte and Wayne Woolway talks about the Tahoe Rim Trail. Listen in...
http://www.horseradionetwork.com/2016/08/10/08-09-2016-endurance-day-tevis-adventures-with-darice-waynes-tahoe-rim-ride-karens-crew-conundrum/

Sunday, August 12, 2018

2018 Distance Horse National Championship Entries are Open!

August 10 2018

Entries are Open for the 2018 Distance Horse National Championships, to be held at Bill Wilson's Farm in Henryville, In. The entry form can be found on the DNL web page under the "Forms" section.

*This is just a reminder that entries for the Breed National Championships must have current leveled membership and the horse must be registered. Qualification requirements can be found on the DNL web page under the "Qualifications" section.

If you are entering any one of the many Open AHA/AERC/SERA/OAATS Endurance Rides or the Open AHA CTR you do not need to have a registered horse or a membership with any breed organization and qualifications are not required. For more information on the ride please see the event flyer on the DNL web page.

All entries can be faxed, mailed or emailed directly to Paige Lockard at paige.lockard@arabianhorses.org. Entries must be hand carried to the event after October 12. Don't forget we have an early bird drawing every day at the ride for riders that submitted their entries to the office by October 1, so don't delay - get your entries in today!

New for 2018:
We have added the LD Challenge Event to the Distance Horse National Championships, which is open to any horse/rider combination that plans to ride all three days (25 miles a day) in the Open LD Rides.

The rider must pay the $20 entry fee for the LD Challenge indicated on the entry form before the start of the first day's ride. This is in addition to the entry fee for each individual open ride. Because we encourage the very best care of our horses, all the LD riders must reach a 56 for pulse down criteria and will have a CRI in the final Vet Check for each day.

On the third day, the entries in the LD Challenge will have a final Vet Check score. The placings and CRI heart rates for each of the three days and the Vet Check at the end of the third day will be converted into a points score. This score will determine the awards for first through fifth winners and all completion riders. All rules and point schedule are available on the AHA Distance National web page under "Exhibitor Information."

This is an exciting year with all our partnered breeds National Championships and our sanctioned Open Ride Organizations!

Partnered Breeds: Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC), Paso Fino Horse Association (PFHA), Performance Shagya-Arabian Horse Registry (PShR), American Morgan Horse Association (AMHA), Akhal-Teke Association of America (ATAA)

Open Ride Sanctioning:
Arabian Horse Association (AHA), American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC), Southeast Endurance Riders Association (SERA), Ohio Arabian and All Breed Trail Riding Society (OAATS)

Wednesday, August 08, 2018

Endurance Horse Podcast - Episode 8

Endurancehorsepodcast - Listen

JANE WATERMAN MOSS-WEG UPDATE-TEVIS-ERIN GLASSMAN - KAREN CHATON - GOALS - UMECRA - COOLEST RIDE & TIE- EPISODE 8 ENDURANCE HORSE PODCAST

Hello and Welcome to Endurance Horse Podcast!

I’m Christina Hyke, an equine photographer in Southern Wisconsin!

Episode 8 of the Endurance Horse Podcast is being published the 7th of August 2018.

While I have been promising you an all Tevis episode, this one, is not quite it yet! We are waiting another week or two to be sure we have gathered all the audios and then will create the podcast. The good news is that this will likely be TWO episodes all from Tevis riders and crew. I promise, it is worth the wait!

Meanwhile- we WILL be starting out this episode with an audio file from Tevis rider, Erin Glassman. Erin was kind enough to send audios about her journey to and prep for the Tevis. The first audio you will hear on episode 8 will be from Erin, and one more on her journey will we near the end of the podcast.

I realize the audio said to stick around until the end & I would share some updates from my story as well. That did not happen- and what did happen was that after I had the WHOLE podcast done, the software had issues & it took me a few hours to sort it out…. And I just wanted to wrap things up.

The updates I can share is that Jim & I have been doing our 5k runs and even got in an 8k VERY HILLY trail run this past weekend! We are enjoying them very much!

I am planning on camping and going to my first LD in two years- updates on that when I do the next episode. The short & sweet of it is that I’m bringing a horse back that has been out of the loop like I have for about 2 years. Wish us luck, send good vibes, prayers etc…I’m hoping to turtle!

To all the riders who take the time to record and send in, THANK YOU SO MUCH, because without you- there is no podcast.

Without further ado- I am happy to bring to you, Episode 8 of the Endurance Horse Podcast

Please check the show notes for links to websites and also to blogs.

Without further ado, I am happy to bring to you, Episode 8, of the Endurance Horse Podcast.

Listen:
https://endurancehorsepodcast.podbean.com/e/jane-waterman-moss-weg-update-tevis-erin-glassman-karen-chaton-goals-umecra-coolest-ride-tie-episode-8-endurance-horse-podcast/

Does a Retired Arabian Racehorse Make a Good Endurance Horse?

Horsereporter.com - Full Article

by Pamela Burton

Riding in the Full Buck Moon

3 August 2018, USA ~ The answer is YES. On 28 July 2018, Heather Reynolds of Dunnellon, Florida, riding the retired Arabian racehorse, ten-year-old, Cayucos (Virgule Al Maury x Tikis Wing Beat) was first across the finish line in Auburn, California, at 10 PM, to claim her third Tevis Cup victory.

By all accounts, the 2018, 100 Mile Tevis Cup was a tough race, made tougher by extreme heat on the trail and treacherous air quality from a number of devastating Northern California fires.

Out of 153 horse registered to start the race, only 64 finished, the last being McCamey Kimbler who came in on HV Cimmarons Goliath at 5:09 am.

Helen Shelley has been training race horses in California since 1995 with a record of over 308 race starts. Cayucos was bred by Betty Jo and Paul Richards and was sent to Shelley for his early training...

Read more here:
https://www.horsereporter.com/does-a-retired-arabian-racehorse-make-a-good-endurance-horse/