Friday, October 19, 2018

Going the distance: Local rider places 10th in 100-mile national championship horse race

DL-Online.com - Full Article

By Kaysey Price on Oct 18, 2018

After fifty years riding horses and more than thirty years of racing them, Teresa Fett was beginning to think she'd never get to ride in a 100-mile horse race, a dream of hers.

A test of strategy and endurance, a 100-mile is set up in "loops" of about 15 to 25 miles, the entirety of which needs to be completed within a 24-hour period — it's no easy feat. The timing had to be right for Teresa and her husband, Dale Fett, to pull it off.


"You know, it's one of those things, you've got to work at getting a horse," said Teresa, adding, "there's not a lot of horses that can do a 100-mile."

The Fetts have had many horses in their day but, either they weren't up to the challenge of the lengthy race, or the timing wasn't right for Teresa and Dale to take it on themselves — until recently, when their 13-year-old Arabian, CR Mister Aaz, proved not only could he run the 100 miles, but he could place them 10th in a national championship endurance race in North Carolina this September...

Read more here:
http://www.dl-online.com/news/4515252-going-distance-local-rider-places-10th-100-mile-national-championship-horse-race

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Is Your Horse Tough? Try the new Idaho Ironhorse Award Challenge

October 15 2018

Northwest Ride Managers Jessica Huber, Regina Rose, Steph Teeter, and Mike and Jessica Cobbley would like to introduce something really special we are offering, starting in 2019.

Together, we will be offering the all-new Idaho Ironhorse Award. If you and your horse complete ALL 9 DAYS of Idaho Pioneer rides:

City of Rocks

Top O The World

Autumn Sun

You win! We are working on really cool, one of a kind swag for this amazing feat! Plus, each successful team will get a free entry for one day at each ride the following year. And, we are gonna blast your accomplishment on every single endurance related website, because- WOW!

No matter if you are riding 50s or LDs, we are going to celebrate this enormous accomplishment with you. You will get a very cool custom award for you and your horse.

Rules are: get a completion with the same horse, same rider, same distance, ALL NINE DAYS of City Of Rocks Pioneer, Top O The World Pioneer, and Autumn Sun Pioneer. That’s the whole challenge!

What Ifs:

Want to level up and switch from LDs to 50s mid-year? As long as you do all 9 days with one horse, you’ll get an award. Something comes up, like you get deathly ill or you break your arm, and someone catch-rides for you? Your incredible horse is going to win something cool if it still completes all 9 days.

So be prepared to bust out some killer horsemanship on some of the most beautiful and epic trails in the northwest. Watch for more information to come as the details mature, but do set your sights on this for next year.

There are no state/regional boundaries for the Idaho Ironhorse. No matter where you are from, if you ride all 9 days, you get some really cool custom awards, and free entries for the following year at all 3 rides.

Have a great winter, and we will see you on the trails.

27-Year-Old PL Mercury Completes Third 100-Mile Endurance Ride of 2018

Thehorse.com - Full Article

After a 2018 campaign that included three difficult 100-mile rides, along with a couple of 50-mile rides, Merc’s owner and rider Claire Godwin, DVM, said he’s still in good condition.

Posted by Marsha Hayes | Oct 15, 2018

PL Mercury, a 27-year-old Arabian gelding, and owner Claire Godwin, DVM, completed the endurance Triple Crown late last month when they finished 15th in the 100-mile American Endurance Ride Conference Championship ride held at the Biltmore Estate, in Asheville, North Carolina.

“Merc” successfully completed three 100-mile rides this year—the 100-mile Old Dominion Ride, which took place in Virginia in June, the 100-mile Tevis Cup in July, when he became the oldest horse to complete the challenging ride through the California mountains, and the Biltmore Estate ride...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/161750/27-year-old-pl-mercury-completes-third-100-mile-endurance-ride-of-2018/

Saturday, October 13, 2018

AERC considers suspending its International Affiliate Status with USEF

by Steph Teeter
Endurance.Net

AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) has historically fulfilled the contractual role of International Affiliate to USEF (United States Equestrian Federation). However a motion from the Executive Committee of AERC will be considered during a November conference call which states: “AERC to suspend the AERC/USEF endurance affiliate agreement effective 12/1/18” .

The justification for this motion includes a lack of response from USEF to consider a request to suspend funding for non-USA FEI (International Equestrian Federation) events. Additionally, the AERC has recently received many letters from its membership requesting AERC to end it’s direct association with USEF due to the differences in how the sport of endurance is conducted internationally, relative to AERC’s original concept of the sport. The FEI emphasis on competition, the perceived lack of adequate consideration for horse welfare, the presence of substantial material and monetary prizes, and the predominance of FEI races being conducted on relatively flat, groomed, courses all contribute to the disconnect between AERC and FEI events.

USEF is recognized by the FEI, and by its International Affiliate Sports as the National Governing Body of equestrian sport in the United States. AERC's withdrawal from its contract with USEF would remove any perceived conflict over AERC's governance of endurance riding.

This action would likely result in the formation or selection of an alternative organization to fulfill the role of USEF’s International Affiliate Sport for endurance racing. However, the motion under consideration would not place any limitations or restrictions on AERC members regarding USEF/FEI participation, either as competitors or event managers.

From the USEF.org website:

USEF Recognized Affiliate Associations play an important role in representing, shaping, and fostering growth within their respective breeds/disciplines. Affiliation with the USEF expands the already important role these organizations play by connecting with all equestrian enthusiasts nationwide and tapping into the ability to reach new audiences. Affiliated associations help the USEF fulfill its mission to provide access to and increase participation in equestrian sports at all levels by ensuring fairness, safety, and enjoyment.

The term Recognized Affiliate Association is reserved for one organization acknowledged by the USEF to represent an International Discipline or the National Breed or Discipline that has a body of rules which has been approved by the USEF Board of Directors for inclusion in the USEF Rule Book. The USEF recognizes only one breed or discipline association for each of these sets of rules. The term International Discipline Association (also referred to as FEI Affiliate) applies to the respective designated representative associations for each of the eight FEI disciplines. Recognized National Affiliate Association (also referred to as Recognized National Affiliate) describes an organization representing a national breed or discipline. For additional information see USEF Bylaw 222.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

2018 October's Endurance Day on Horses in the Morning

HorsesInTheMorning.com - Listen

Oct 9, 2018

On this Endurance episode Karen and Glenn chat with Claire Godwin, DVM about how she keeps her 27 year old horse Mercury happy and healthy; completing three different hundred mile rides in one season. AERC National Champion Holly Corcoran recaps her win and we share our thoughts on the AERC’s open letter to USEF and what it could mean for the future of the sport.

Listen:
http://www.horsesinthemorning.com/future-of-endurance-horse-longevity-aerc-champion-corcoran-endurance-day-for-10-09-18/

Sunday, October 07, 2018

Endurance Youth Spotlight: Leonarado Fuentes

ArabianHorseLife.com - Full Story

September 26, 2018
by Emma Kersey-Doherty

Twelve-year-old Leonarado Fuentes caught up with Arabian Horse Life to tell us a little bit more about his love of Endurance and the special Arabian horses in his world. Leonarado juggles his passion for Endurance riding with National-level Track, as well as competitive Soccer. His love for the sport and his Arabian horses shines through in his interview.

(Emma) Tell us about yourself?

(Leonarado) My name is Leonarado. I am 12 years old and live in Prairieville, La. I do Endurance rides on our Arabians Leo and Raj and experience challenges on the trail which make it fun. You never know what you are going to encounter whether it is a creek crossing, wild animal, or just being out in nature. I love Arabian horses because they truly want to be with you and never quit on the trail.

(Emma) Who are the special Arabian and Half-Arabian horses in your life, and

(Leonarado) Leo is my six-year-old Polish Arabian. He came from Boisvert Farms, which specializes in English Pleasure, but he loves the trails so much more than the arena. He is very sweet to everyone he meets and always gets me safely through every ride. We have done multiple 25-mile Endurance rides and won high vet score recently (this means out of the Top Ten finishing horses, he was the most physically fit disregarding finish time or weight carried). His registered name is Rizing Motion BF...

Read more here:
https://www.arabianhorselife.com/single-post/2018/09/26/Youth-Spotlight-Leonarado-Fuentes

Saturday, October 06, 2018

Absence of a Debacle at the 2018 AERC National Championships


www.endurance.net/international/USA/2018AERCNC

October 5 2018
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

With the looming specter of the previous week's botched World Equestrian Games Endurance race, and the threat of approaching of Hurricane Florence, both within a stone's throw of Biltmore, the American Endurance Ride Conference National Championships went off without a hitch, with kudos to top competition, horsemanship, and sportsmanship.

The Biltmore Estate near Asheville, North Carolina, has been the site of the Biltmore Endurance Rides since 1994. It was the second time the AERC National Championships were run over this course (2012 was the first one). This year's events were held September 20-22.

Cheryl and Stagg Newman have managed the Biltmore rides since 2006, and the trails for this year's National Championships had been test ridden in the May Biltmore ride. Hurricane Florence ultimately cooperated, though it was questionable up to the weekend before the ride.

"The ride site had maybe 2 inches of rain," Cheryl Newman said. "Asheville is a rain shadow, so it got less. We didn't really get the brunt of Florence. We didn't even get that much wind, which was a bit of a surprise.

"The storm was out of here Sunday. By Monday morning we knew we were fine. Monday we sent out the word that yes, we were going to have the ride. 'Come one, come all, we have a nice welcome mat out for you.' And people did come.

"By the time they got there, the event site was quite dry, and by the time the ride rolled around on Thursday for the 50, the trails were in really good shape."


The 50 Mile Championship

In that fine display of horsemanship and sportsmanship, Erin Lemmons and Tuscarora John (aka "TJ"), and Jeremy Reynolds and Anydaynow (aka "P") tied for first place in the 50 mile Championship in a ride time of 5:20.

Erin Lemmons, 32, and her 12-year-old gelding Tuscarora John hauled in from Stephenville, Texas. "I had a plan of the pace I was going to do for all 3 loops," Erin said, "and I stuck to it."

"We'd won the Biltmore 50 in May," Jeremy Reynolds, 38, said of P, his 17-year-old mount, "and I beat a really good horse in a sprint-off. So I knew coming into the Championship, he felt really good training and everything, I knew he was going to be tough to beat."

Both Erin and TJ, and Jeremy and P, were near the front of the pack of 68 starters the entire ride, and on the last loop that pair of riders had a clear lead and obviously still had strong horses.

Jeremy said, "When it came down to just Erin and me, I offered, would you like to tie, these horses have worked really hard. We're not going to go slow the last loop, but there's no point taking extra risks. And she agreed, so we rode together and tied."

Erin said, "At the last vet check, my sister, my brother-in-law, my mom and dad were all saying, omigosh, he looks really good, he's still full of energy, head up, ears up, looking around, like we're not done yet, so they said, don't do anything stupid, of course!

"Jeremy's horse P looked pretty good. And we just kind of traded off. He led a little bit, I led a little bit, we rode together on some two-tracks. I mean, it was perfect. Both horses truly deserved to win."

Heather Reynolds summed up the ride with a bit of humor, "We were 45 minutes away from the WEG course. The weather was similar and the trail more technical. The completion rate was stellar. Without stopping and restarting the ride and without canceling the ride, there was a 74% completion rate for the championship 50 mile ride (44 starters and 28 finishers) and there were 22 finishers of the 24 starters on the Open 50."

Jeremy and Erin also tied for top Lightweights; 3rd place Alisija Zabavska and Hidden Assetts were first Featherweight; first Middleweight was 7th place Jane Rodrigue on Al Shama Shaazon; first heavyweight was 18th place Don Meuten on FYF Wolverine; first Junior was 13th place Madeline Isaacs on Shasta.

Anydaynow is by Patriot Missle (by Wiking) out of Annatiki, by SX Champion. He was bred by CreRun Farm and is owned by Barbara Hershberger, from Pennsylvania. Anydaynow has competed for 10 seasons with a record of 23 finishes in 32 starts and 1195 miles. Barbara competed on him for his first 8 seasons; both Heather and Jeremy, from Dunellon, Florida, have ridden him the last two.

"He's the first horse that Heather and I sold when we decided to become professional horsemen," Jeremy said. "We never owned him; he came back to us a few times during his career for training, when Barbara wanted us to work on him."

Tuscarora John, by Line Dancer out of Fawora, by Fawor, was bred by Jane Teutsch of Texas. Erin had previously looked at TJ as a 4 or 5-year-old. "We were kind of new to endurance at the time, and didn't know a good thing when we saw one. We really wanted him, but Jane wanted a little more money than we had budgeted, and we weren't sure what to pay for a good endurance horse. So we did pass."

However, Erin kept an eye out for TJ. Former USA Endurance Chef d'Equipe Emmett Ross had bought TJ and was training him but eventually decided to sell him. When Erin found out, she wanted to try him out again.

"November of 2015, Emmett brought him and another horse out. I rode the other horse first, because Emmett was saying TJ could be a little bit of a handful. I said, 'Really! that sounds like my kind of horse!' But i got on the other horse first. We rode a few miles, then we traded.

"And I just instantly fell in love. I didn't care what issues we had to work through, as far as recoveries. It was just - this horse loves to go, loves his job, and is a dream to ride. So I had to have him!"

TJ not only tied for first place in the 50-mile Championship; he also took Best Condtion. TJ is a first place and Best Condition machine, since Erin began riding him in 2016. (Previous to that, the gelding finished 4 out of 4 starts). Together they've completed 10 of 12 starts, with 8 first places, 2 second places, and 10 Best Conditions.

"TJ’s first career was a track horse," Erin said. "He is a stakes winner!" That's likely where his competitive nature comes from. "He's an amazing horse. He's really competitive. That's why I really enjoy riding him!"


The 100 Mile Championship

Holly Corcoran, 54, from Pennsylvania, had no idea she was more than 2 hours ahead of the nearest competitor when she and Poete crossed the finish line in the 100 mile Championship in a ride time of 12:26.47.

"I felt incredibly focused. I didn't know anything else that was going on around me. I knew I was an hour ahead at some point in time, but I didn't even know I was 2 hours ahead of anyone when I finished," Holly said.

Coming into the ride, Holly had good expectations of her 11-year-old gelding. "I had ridden the Bitlmore 100 in the spring [finishing 4th and earning Best Condition], and I was hoping to decrease my time. But then we dealt with high heat and humidity this time around." They still beat their previous time, by 8 minutes.

And Holly cleverly used a good ride strategy. "His ego gets fed by passing horses, so we actually started 10-15 minutes behind, nowhere near the start, and ended up passing just about everybody and coming within 6 minutes of the front runners. And we stayed there the rest of the ride."

Holly and Poete, and Meg Sleeper and Syrocco Cadence rode together from loop 2 onward. "Meg is a fierce competitor, so she really kept me on my toes to make sure that my turnaround and recoveries were right on target. We were basically head to head, finishing within a minute or so of each other for the pulse times, and heading out through the 5th loop. And at that vet check, they found some lameness on Meg's horse so she was pulled. Then I continued the last loop alone.

"I had outstanding crew. And without them, I don't think I would have been able to have the performance I did, because it did get hot and humid, and they kept Poete cool. He was eating like a machine. Toward the end of the holds, he was quickly into the 40's [pulse rate] and staying at a good low rate before we were ready to go out, which I think made a big difference for him being able to keep up the steady pace during the ride."

Poete also took Best Condition, something he's done in all 3 of his starts this year. The gelding now has a record of 18 finishes in 22 starts and 1205 AERC miles and 5 Best Conditions over 7 seasons.

By Banjo de Falgas out of Poetikka, by Statistic, Poete was bred by Tom and Holly Sayvetz of Asgard Arabians in West Virginia. Holly picked him us as a 4-year-old and started him under saddle.

"I'm really lucky because I think the Asgards have the athleticism and genetics that they have naturally low heart rates and they have quick recoveries."

Holly actually has 5 Asgard Arabians, including Poetrie, a 7-year-old 3/4 sister to Poete, who finished 10th in Thursday's 50-mile Championship. "Asgards are like potato chips. You can't have just one!"

Holly and Poete were first Lightweight; Marcia Weilbach and Zanthus Fury tied for 2nd place and first Featherweight with Wendy Mancini and Sterling; 16th place Cheryl Van Deusen and Ebs Regal Majjaan was first Middleweight; 9th place Guy Worthington and PA Hi-Spirit was first Heavyweight.

33 started the 100-mile Championship and 16 finished. Worth noting was the incomparable 78-year-old Jan Worthington (with over 32,000 AERC miles), who rode with her son Guy and finished 8th aboard Dimitri KS; and Claire Godwin and 27-year-old incomparable PL Mercury finished 15th, for his third 100-mile completion of the year (including Tevis and Old Dominion!), and his 17th 100 overall.


A Smooth National Championship

Ride manager Cheryl Newman summed up the ride.

"Well… nobody's going to really write paeans of praise to the heat and humidity. Particularly on Saturday for the 100 - let's say it was seriously humid that night.

"But overall, in the scheme of things it was a very smooth ride. There were minimal glitches and the riders all came with a very positive attitude and seemed to be very pleased with the ride itself, and how the trails presented themselves.

"They came ready to be pleased, and they had a good time."

More ride info at:
www.endurance.net/international/USA/2018AERCNC

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

AERC Announces International Endurance Equine Excellence Award

October 2, 2018

The American Endurance Ride Conference is pleased to announce its first-ever International Endurance Equine Excellence Award. 

Nominations are now open for this award, designed to recognize the best horses from around the world in overall achievement. AERC, in seeking to emphasize longevity as an essential ingredient to success, requires that the nominated horse have a minimum of eight years of endurance competition. The award's minimum mileage requirement is 2500 miles/4000 km in rides of 50 miles/80 km or longer. 

The top horses will be named at the AERC convention's national award ceremony on March 9, 2019, in Reno, Nevada. Winning horses will receive a custom-embroidered horse blanket and owners will receive a custom trophy. Awards will be mailed to nominators if they can not present at the AERC convention. 

"The purpose of this award is recognize gifted endurance athletes/horses that have consistently and reliably performed at a high level for many years," said Past AERC President Michael Campbell of Texas. "Typically a single owner/rider has managed the horse's conditioning and nurtured the horse's attitude in a way that exemplifies the relationship between horse and rider typical of traditional endurance rides over difficult trails and terrain." 

By reaching out beyond the USA and Canada, the nonprofit organization, founded in the U.S. in 1972, hopes to acknowledge those riders and horse owners around the world who share in AERC's core principles. 

"AERC hopes this award will assist in a return to traditional endurance riding values which emphasize the partnership between a horse and rider team over a challenging trail as opposed to current trends toward racing that emphasize speed over flat courses with little concern for the overall well-being of the horse," said Campbell. 

"AERC hopes to receive nominations from all around the world where riders value their horses and the original goals of endurance riding which emphasize 'to finish is to win'," said Campbell. 

Nominations are due by December 30, 2018. 

Award requirements: https://aerc.org/static/2018ExcellenceAward.aspx 

Online application form: https://aerc.org/static/2018ExcellenceAward.aspx 

If you have any questions, please contact the AERC office: office@aerc.org

Monday, October 01, 2018

#Enough is Enough!

EnduranceIntrospection.com

by Patti Stedman
October 1 2018

Letter sent this morning to AERC Board of Directors. If you are a member and you agree with the sentiments in this letter and the members who signed it, it is not enough to hit “like” on Facebook, or make a comment saying you agree, or send me a note saying you agree wholeheartedly.

You must email your AERC Board of Directors (here’s the link to do so: Link to email AERC BoD ), provide them with your AERC membership number, the service you provide to the organization (Ride Manager, Veterinarian, Committee Member, Ride Volunteer, Trail Volunteer), and include “Enough is Enough!” in the subject line of your email. Feel free to cut and paste the contents of the letter if you like.

E-mail sent 10/1/2018:

Dear AERC BoD Members, Kathleen and Troy:

Several long-time AERC members drafted a letter outlining our disenchantment with USEF/FEI international endurance. We sent the letter to a number of AERC members who have contributed a great deal to the organization and who we believed would want to join us as signatories. We were not surprised at the overwhelming positive response. Most replied “YES” or “add me.” We believe the majority of AERC members share the sentiments expressed here.

We’ve added Troy to this distribution to request publication of the letter in the next issue of Endurance News, in an attempt to reach AERC members who do not frequent social media or the internet.

We understand that the Executive Committee and AERC-I Committee have sent a letter to USEF, requesting changes.

Unfortunately, we have all been witness to the previous letters, and the lack of substantial response from USEF/FEI. It is time that we step away; these are not our egregious issues to fix.

Let’s determine our own destiny and show our members as well as the world that we have had enough and will no longer support USEF/FEI endurance until they can improve and enforce their rules.

Thank you.

***

September 27, 2018

To the AERC Board of Directors:

Many of us within AERC recall with pride when endurance became an international-level sport. This evolution, however, has resulted in changes we can no longer tolerate or support. We have observed with growing alarm years of corruption, egregious issues regarding horse welfare, attempts to influence through example, pleas to stay at the table, and letters, motions and new rules to address the problems to no avail. We have lost confidence in these efforts to produce real change on the actual field of play. The issues associated with international endurance continue growing within our sport. High emotions are dividing us, and the dilemma is compromising the sport we love.

The recent World Endurance Games, held on American soil, were not officially sanctioned by AERC, but relied on the support of many of our riders, horses, veterinarians, and members. Many sensed a coming disaster but had no power to prevent it. AERC sent a letter to USEF, expressing concern about a “level playing field.” Connie Caudill, a member of the AERC Board of Directors, initiated a Change.org petition demanding FEI make changes to tangibly ensure equine welfare. That petition has garnered well over 5,000 signatures.

Despite the fact that the Tryon WEG was not AERC-sanctioned, our sport will forever be tarnished by this event. The competition was mired with avoidable controversy and competitors were denied a level field of play.

The WEG is the final catalyst after years of poisonous problems within USEF and FEI regarding international endurance. It is time for decisive and bold leadership from AERC. We must stand alongside other National Federations equally dismayed by the corruption of our sport and decisively shout, “ENOUGH.”

We urge the AERC Board of Directors to respectfully decline executing the affiliate endurance organization contract/agreement with USEF until such time as FEI has made significant and tangible changes to enact and enforce rules consistently, without favoritism or undue influence by sponsors. We ask that international endurance cease to be run over courses allowing unfettered speed demanding few exceptional skills. Lead us in our return to more tempered, elite competitions over challenging, technical terrain that tests the finest in horsemanship, athleticism and strategy.

There is much that can be done to improve our sport in the USA and Canada as AERC. Let us focus on using our voice and actions to demonstrate to the world that we are different from what they saw at WEG. The AERC National Championship, just a week later, showed how elite events can and should be run.

We hope other National Federations will see AERC as a leader true to the foundation of our sport and invite them to work with us in building a new vision of international riding, following in the footsteps of the Young Rider International Exchange Program, without the taint of USEF or FEI involvement.

Our AERC members and horses deserve a sport truly modeled after our motto, To Finish Is To Win. We call upon you to lead us forward out of the mire and into a future true to our integrity.

Sincerely (listed alphabetically),

Stan Alkemade, 8475, NE Region, Veterinarian, Former FEI Vet, Former Team Canada/East Veterinarian

Nina Bomar, 4165, PS Region

Elysa Braunstein, VMD, M31822, PS Region, Veterinarian

Kathy Broaddus, 11416, NE Region, Veterinarian

Dianna Chapek, 4093, W Region, Former Director, Pard’ners Award

Cindy Collins, 176, MT Region, Former Director, Ride Manager, WY Trails Advocate

Diane Connolly, M31597, NE Region, Ride Manager

Crockett Dumas, 748, MT Region, Former Director (22 years)/AERC President, Started Trails Committee (1983), HOF Person

Steve Downs, M38411, PS Region

Randy Eiland, 39, SW Region, Former Director/AERC President, Former Chair RM, Sponsorship, Rules and Sanctioning Committees

Denny Emerson, M19095, SE Region

Dawn Engle-Hilliard, M36420, NE Region, Ride Volunteer

Ruth Ferland, M33457, NE Region, Ride Manager, NH Trails Advocate

Kerry Greear, M33578, MT Region, Former Ride Manager, Former Co-Chair Education Committee, AERC Education Committee

Susan Garlinghouse, DVM, 6747, W Region, Vet Committee, Former DAL and Education Committee Chair, Volunteer Service Award

Becky Glaser, 6542, W Region, Former USEF Selector, Former Junior Committee

Lynne Glazer, 14580, PS Region, Former Ride Manager, Clinic Organizer

Claire Godwin, DVM, 9671, NE Ride Manager

Laura Hayes, 2741, MT Region, Former Director/VP, Former Chair Welfare of the Horse Committee, Ride Manager

Bri Henderson, DVM, M30691, NE Region, Veterinarian

Elisabet Hiatt, 5022, W Region, Ride Manager

Dean Hilliard, M37752, NE Region, Ride Volunteer

Blaine Jack, M36339, NE Region, Ride Manager

Pamela Karner, M33003, NE Region, Ride Manager, Veterinarian, FEI PTV

Jamie Kerr, DVM, 7841, W Region, Veterinarian, Former FEI Veterianarian, Former Vet Committee

Jan Mutchler, 17308, SW Region, Ride Manager

Lani Newcomb, 658, NE Region, Veterinarian, Old Dominion BoD, Ride Manager

Tom Noll, M30552, NW Region, Former Director

Lori Oleson, 1418, W Region, Ride Manager

Taylor Pashong-Walck, M22483, SW Region, Ride/Asst Manager

Pam Peace, 5822, W Region, Ride Manager

Patti Pizzo, 9968, NE Region, Former Director, Ride Manager

Jennifer Poling, M32258, NE Region, Decade Ride Manager, Former AERC-I Zone Rep, WV Trails Advocate

Naomi Preston, 4096, Former P&G Committee, Owner: HOF Horse

Carla Richardson, M34774, MT Region, Former Director, Welfare of the Horse Committee

Susie Schomburg, 6505, MT Region, Former Director (10+ years), RM Committee, Ride Manager (28 years), MRER President

Cindy Simcox, 9144, MT Region, Ride Manager

Patti Stedman, M20888, NE Region, Former Director and Chair of Ride Managers & Education Committees

Roger Taylor, 1496, SW Region, Former Director/Treasurer, HOF Person, Ride Manager

Kevin Waters, 6784, MT Region, Committee Member, Former Director

Bruce Weary, DC, 4160, SW Region, Former Director, Member of Welfare of the Horse, Education, P&G and Veterinary Committees

Barbara White, 2446, W Region, Committee Member