Friday, December 14, 2018

An Interview with Dave Nicholson - AHW January 1983

Issuu.com - Read the Article

Published on Mar 18, 2012

Nearly 30 years ago — in the Arabian Horse World January 1983 issue — we interviewed endurance rider Dave Nicholson, who was named to AERC’s Hall of Fame in 1997.

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Newest Directors-At-Large to Represent AERC

AERC.org

December 12 2018

Congratulations to the Directors-at-Large who will be representing the AERC membership, beginning on March 9, 2019. Here they are, in alphabetical order. 

Olin Balch DVM 
Nina Bomar 
Mollie Krumlaw-Smith 
Robert Marshall DVM 
Mike Maul 
Heather Reynolds 
Christoph Schork 
Tim Worden

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

2018 December's Endurance Day on Horses in the Morning

Horsesinthemorning.com - Listen

Green Bean Tips, ’19 National Championships, ’18 100 Mile Champ, Endurance Day for Dec. 11, 2018


On this month’s Endurance episode we chat with AERC National 100 Mile champion Hannah Johnson, Dr. Melissa Ribley gives us a preview of the 2019 National Championships being held on the West Coast and Mary Howell has some great tips for new Endurance competitors a.k.a Green Beans.

More info and listen to the episode at:
http://www.horsesinthemorning.com/green-bean-tips-19-national-championships-18-100-mile-champ-endurance-day-for-dec-11-2018/?fbclid=IwAR3xOFAM-VDhZ1LZwDAjhWqgTODpbPdKSUB3ZgBsIGvca7N9E_vtAcbmTBE

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Arabian Horse Association dissatisfied with USEF, Considers New Governance Options

ShaneDarnell.com - Full Article

DECEMBER 6, 2018 BY SHANE DARNELL

USEF could be facing over $1.5 Million dollars in annual revenue losses if the Arabian Horse Association (AHA) decides to self govern or join other breeds considering an exit from the over regulated “Federation”.

(AHA) the largest non-Olympic breed organization with approximately 12,000 USEF members held it’s National Membership Convention last month, and voted unanimously (according to insiders) to begin a feasibility study that could result in an exit from USEF governance within 12 months.

AHA sited material revenue impact because of their exhibitor loss to non-USEF affiliated breeds. The perception among AHA members is that USEF is over regulated and offers very little in return to their breed for the cost of association...

Read more here:
http://shanedarnell.com/arabsvotechange/?fbclid=IwAR3psftBNUZfCbQ3zjoNGlT6XWW6aO5zcjtQSy4u__G-_3ObE3q-b45GJIo

Monday, December 10, 2018

Ultrarunning History Podcast 12: Endurance Riding – Part 1

Ultrarunninghistory.com - Listen and Read more

December 8 2018
By Davy Crockett

Both a podcast episode and a full article
(Listen to the podcast episode which includes a bonus running story.)

Endurance riding is the equestrian sport that includes controlled long-distance riding/racing. The sport has existed for more than a century in various forms. 100-mile trail ultramarathons, especially the Western States Endurance Run, Old Dominion 100, and Vermont 100 can trace their roots to endurance riding. Other trail 100s that emerged in the 1980s were also influenced by endurance riding practices.

Ultrarunners should feel indebted to those of the endurance riding sport who had the vision to establish some early 100-mile trail races for runners. The trail 100-miler inherited many of the same procedures of aid stations, course markings, trail work, crews, medical checks, and of course the belt buckle award. Once ultrarunners understand their history, a common kinship is felt between the two sister endurance sports. So trade in your running shoes for horse shoes for a few minutes and learn about an inspiring and adventuresome endurance riding history that impacted the sport of ultrarunning.

The Origins of the Endurance Riding Sport in America

Usually the credit for establishing the endurance riding sport is given to Wendell Robie of Auburn, California when he initiated the Western States Trail Ride (Tevis Cup) in 1955. (That history will be covered in Part 2). But endurance riding competitions of various formats existed long before 1955. Vermont must be recognized as the birth place for the endurance rides in America.

Perhaps it depends on the definition for the “endurance ride.” The debate around the definition of what an endurance ride is, is similar to the definition of what an ultramarathon is. Is an ultramarathon anything over a marathon or do they start at 50 miles? One published definition for the endurance ride is “a timed test against the clock of an individual horse/rider team’s ability to traverse a marked, measured cross-county “trail” over natural terrain consisting of a distance of 50 to 100 miles in one day.” That is a modern, very limited definition especially the “trail” limitation, and the one-day limitation. But it still does apply to many very early endurance rides that predated the Western States Trail Ride...

Read more and listen here:
http://ultrarunninghistory.com/endurance-riding-1/?fbclid=IwAR2bFLPIudofhy1duOxKwjaDfH1yzB-xnlUBtWcOPjC5PCwvdKtJbOdEPuQ

Thursday, December 06, 2018

2019 Distance Horse National Championships

Distance Nationals is heading back to Alanna & Gunnar Franks Ranch in Vinita, Okla. from October 25-27.

The American Saddlebred Registry (ASR) will join our growing list of partnered breeds, which include: the Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC), Paso Fino Horse Association (PFHA), Performance Shagya-Arabian Registry (PShR), American Morgan Horse Association (AMHA), and the Akhal-Teke Association of America (ATAA).

Remember, along with all of the National Championships offered, there are multiple Open Owl Hoot 25 Mile LD’s and 50 Mile rides along with an Open Owl Hoot 100 Mile ride and a CTR. These Open rides do not require qualifications or membership and are open to any breed.

More information at:
https://www.arabianhorses.org/competition/national-events/distance-nationals/

Monday, December 03, 2018

Who You Callin' Old: 19-year-old Endurance Horse Fire Mt Malabar is Still On Fire



At 19, Fire Mt Malabar has over 7000 miles, 16 first places, and 47 Best Conditions (3rd on the all-time BC list). And he's not done yet.


December 3 2018
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

The 16-hand, slight bay gelding with a star and thin strip and 4 white socks is a familiar sight going down the Northwest and Mountain region endurance trails. But you might do a double take at his rider.

Lee Pearce of Baker City, Oregon, was Fire Mt Malabar's (almost) exclusive Heavyweight rider since 2006: a partnership of over 5300 miles, 43 Best Condition awards, and a 2011 National Best Condition award.

(You can read about Lee's earlier adventures with Malabar here.)

Lee on Malabar hitting 5000 miles

In 2015 Malabar and Lee headed to the Big Horn 100; they started the ride, and passed the first vet check, but then Lee stopped with him out on the trail because something wasn't right. Turned out Malabar had contracted salmonella, most likely at an overnight stopover in Dubois on the way; he became so ill that they nearly lost him at the vet clinic. He went on to recover, and Lee and Malabar came back firing on all pistons in 2016, with a 10 for 10 record, though Lee rode him more conservatively.

Now it's Lee's wife Naomi Preston who has the esteemed seat in Malabar's saddle. How she got there was a process of talking Lee out of him, since he had another nice and talented horse to ride (JAC Winterhawk), and since Naomi didn't really have a main endurance horse. "Maybe it was pity that he gave me Malabar," Naomi laughs.


Naomi had ridden Malabar on only one previous 50 mile ride in June of 2011 at the Owyhee Cheap Thrills No Frills in Idaho. "It was a magical ride. Sue Hedgecock and I rode together the whole day. [Sue rode LZP Julioslastchance, her eventual Haggin Cup winner.] It was pretty, there were wildflowers, blue sky; the two of us just had a ball. And we decided to tie for the win, because the horses were even. It was really fun." Naomi had never ridden Malabar before, and the gelding was perfect that day, since Lee had gotten the 'kinks' out of him in winning the previous day's 50.


Naomi and Malabar at City of Rocks
Fast forward 6 years to Idaho's City of Rocks Pioneer ride in June of 2017, where Naomi swung a leg aboard Malabar in a new partnership. Usually riding with Lee aboard Hawk, Naomi and Malabar finished 16 of 16 rides (810 miles) in 2017 (and don't forget the 2 rides and 100 miles with Lee before Naomi took the reins), and 18 of 19 rides in 2018 (940 miles). Their only stumbling block in 2018 was Tevis, and that was a Rider Option pull, when Naomi's metabolics went awry. "Malabar was fine," Naomi said. "I was the weak link!" (Lee and Hawk went on to finish Tevis.)

"Malabar's showing no signs of slowing down," Naomi says. "It's almost like he's got a second career. We got 4 wins and 4 Best Conditions this year.
We tied for the win of the 3-day Strawberry Fields Pioneer with Lee and Hawk - only 3 pairs did all 3 days. Very tough ride. And Malabar reached 7000 miles in September.


"We weren't pushing or anything - Malabar's just kind of on fire. He's just going so well, and his recoveries are great."

On one of those wins this fall, Naomi and Malabar tied with Christoph Schork and GE Pistol Annie at the Outlaw and the Virgin Pioneer ride in Utah. Christoph is AERC's winningest rider, and you can usually expect Christoph to be setting a smart pace at the start of rides and finishing in front. And GE Pistol Annie is no slouch, with 48 completions in 49 starts, 33 of those first places (all with Christoph), and 21 Best Conditions.

Naomi says, "We came into the lunch vet check, and I thought, well, if Malabar doesn't pulse down right away, this will be a sign he's going too fast. And they both pulsed down at the same time; Malabar of course drops to 40. Christoph and I rode together the whole day, and we had a ball."

Naomi recalled that Lee and Malabar had ridden with Christoph and Pistol Annie many years earlier. One can easily imagine the two experienced, talented endurance horses eyeballing each other in mutual recognition down the trail.


Known in his 'younger years' for some antics - spooking, bucking, going too fast - Malabar tried his tricks on Naomi just once, on her first ride with him in 2017 at City of Rocks. "We were going down a long road, and something spooked Malabar, and the wind was blowing a million miles an hour, and he took off at a gallop. So not only did he spook, but he bolted, too. Lee was thinking I was going to be roadkill, but I stayed on, and got him stopped.

"That's the only time he's really ever done anything kind of crazy with me. I was really fit and strong then. I wasn't getting off that horse. Luckily he just ran straight. But it did scare me!


"He's really settled down. I love riding him. It's just fun. We're in that zone. He reminds me a lot of riding Mustang Lady in several ways, just because he's a veteran, he knows to eat and drink, he carries a steady pace - he knows all that stuff. You know how nice it is riding a horse that's experienced."

(Naomi's phenomenal Mustang Lady entered the AERC Hall of Fame in 2001 - read about her here).


Experienced and, still, on fire. Malabar probably is getting a 'second wind' with a Lightweight rider, but it could just be that he's that good. He comes from some of the best old-time, proven bloodlines you can find in the endurance sport: Fire Mt Malabar is by Jim and Jackie Bumgardner's legendary endurance stallion and sire Sierra Fadwah (AERC Hall of Fame 1992) out of Malabar Dawn, by Malabar Amir.

While the gelding is (mostly) all business on the trail now (mostly, unless Naomi tries a side pull on him after a lunch vet check at a ride, which he does not like), he can throw in a little crow hop on training rides. "It's not anything that you'd fall off," Naomi says, "but a crop hop that says, 'I'm feeling good!'"


Generally kind of aloof to people, Malabar still knows he's quite special, coming to the pasture gate when Lee or Naomi are around, to get let out for his "special" meals. He thinks any hay on the ground is his bed. He has a bit of a sense of humor, too, taking advantage of Naomi when she's trying to put his bridle on. He puts his head in the sky because he knows that he's tall and Naomi is short and can't reach him when he does that. The only horse in the herd he can't push around is his brother Fire Mt Legacy.


Malabar knows how good he is. And he's not done yet. Lee and Naomi are planning on more multi-day rides next year, which Malabar excels at. "Lee and I really love multi-days. And we really love the Duck rides (Dave Nicholson's multi-day XP rides). The trails are beautiful, we get to see different scenery, and the camaraderie is great.

"Malabar's just that special quality of a horse that knows their job, and has fun doing it and you don't have to worry about them. It's just the ultimate.

"It's a blessing - really a blessing."


photos by Lee and Naomi, and a few by Crockett Dumas