Thursday, November 16, 2017

USA Young Rider: Hannah Weightman

FEI.org - Full Story

08 November 2017

There’s a new breed of rider breathing fresh life into the sport of Endurance

One such athlete is 19 year-old Hannah Weightman from New Jersey and is currently a freshman at Stockton University majoring in business. Her career plan is to enter the business side of the equestrian world.

When Hanna was eight years old, her parents signed her up for summer pony camp. She spent six years riding at a local eventing barn before being introduced to Hugh and Holly MacDonald, also of Shamong. The MacDonald’s offered Hanna a young Morgan gelding named Gomez to train.

“While riding at Holly’s I was introduced to trail riding and started to compete in competitive trail rides,” Hanna recalls. “During the time I spent at Holly’s I have learned so much about horse care, hard work, and responsibility. My work with Gomez has built my confidence on the ground and in the saddle.”

Hugh and Holly also introduced Hanna to Meg Sleeper of Frenchtown, New Jersey, who is an international Endurance competitor, and veterinary cardiologist at the University of Florida. “I thought it was the coolest thing that I was riding one of her horses in 2014, I really look up to her as a rider, vet, and friend,” Hanna says.

Hanna’s first FEI ride was the Greenway Getaway in Dunnellon, Florida. She rode the 50 on Meg’s horse Syrocco Rabia (Rabi). She completed a 50-mile ride the day before on Syrocco Harmony (Harmon) as well. Of her 11 FEI rides, she completed nine of them, and was first in six of them. She’s competed throughout the East Coast, in Kentucky, and Ontario, Canada...

Read more here:
http://www.fei.org/stories/young-riders-hannah-weightman-equestrian-endurance

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

2018 Anne Ayala Junior Scholarship Applications Available

AERC.org

You are invited to apply for the 2018 Anne Ayala Junior Scholarship

Open to AERC Juniors and Young Riders in good standing from their high school senior year through age 21 (must be younger than 22 as of 1/1/2017)

Applicants must have a minimum of 500 AERC lifetime miles

Applicants must have an unweighted GPA of at least 3.0

One scholarship of $1000 will be awarded. This scholarship can be applied to colleges and universities as well as technical schools and specialized training programs.

Applications will be reviewed by the AERC Hall of Fame Committee

The 2018 AERC scholarship recipient will be announced at the AERC Annual Convention on March 10, 2018, in Reno, Nevada

Past recipients are not eligible

Applications must be received by January 5, 2018, and must be submitted to the AERC office via mail:
AERC, Attn: Scholarship, P.O. Box 6027, Auburn, CA 95604

or e-mail: office@aerc.org (see application form for details)

For the application see:
https://aerc.org/static/2018scholarship.pdf

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

How A Steeplejack, A Teenager And A Mule Won The Great American Horse Race

WBUR.org - Read or Listen

July 28, 2017
Martin Kessler

The year was 1976.

"People were looking for a party," recalls Curt Lewis, who in 1976 had just finished his journalism degree at Wichita State. "Vietnam was just over in '75. Watergate was over. Nixon was gone," he says. "Everyone was looking for a good time."

And there was an excuse to celebrate. The U.S. was turning 200 — and the birthday party seemed to last all year.

In honor of the bicentennial, trains and airplanes were painted red, white and blue. A fleet of tall ships sailed down the Hudson River.

And there was a horse race unlike any other.

The Great American Horse Race

It was called the Great American Horse Race, and it would span nearly 100 days and 3,500 miles, starting in New York, heading to Missouri, and then following the Pony Express route to California.

Lewis was hired by the race organizers to document all the greatness and Americaness of the Great American Horse Race. And also the competition.

The rider who covered the distance fastest would get $25,000 – worth about $100,000 in today’s dollars.

About 100 riders signed up. Cowboys took a break from rodeos. World War II veterans, finished with their missions on submarines and B-17 bombers, also entered. So did a sheriff — and even an Austrian count...

Read or listen for more:
http://www.wbur.org/onlyagame/2017/07/28/best-of-virl-pierce-norton-horse-mule-race

Friday, November 10, 2017

Canada's Anya Levermann Wins CEI 3* Get-R-Done Endurance Ride

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

November 9, 2017 | Comments
by: Equestrian Canada

Anya Levermann, 17, of 100 Mile House, BC continued to prove she is a force to be reckoned with in international endurance after her first-place finish in the CEI 3* division of the Get-R-Done Endurance Ride in Inyokern, CA, held Nov. 4, 2017.

Levermann was partnered with Monk, a 15-year-old Arabian gelding owned by Chris Martin that she first began riding in 2016. Inyokern marked the pair’s second victory to date, having also won the CEI YJ-2* 120km division in Trout Lake, WA this past May.

“I really like riding him,” said Levermann of Monk, who helped her become Canada’s first Young Rider to earn FEI Elite status following their performance in Washington. “He’s really competitive and he doesn’t really like to slow down...”

Read more here:
https://www.horse-canada.com/horse-news/anya-levermann-wins-cei-3-get-r-done-endurance-ride/

Tuesday, November 07, 2017

Owyhee Hallowed Weenies: The 2017 Finale



Tuesday November 7 2017
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

We had it all for the last ride of the season, the Owyhee Hallowed Weenies: gently watered trails (after 4 months of no rain), a little morning sleet/snowballs, a little afternoon sun, 1 little bouquet of purple asters on the trails, a glimpse of the Owyhee mountains blanketed in a heavy coat of snow, a couple of new riders all the way from Portland, a bonfire in the driveway, a modest group of riders, good chili, good bluegrass jamming, several Princesses, an eye-popping Lady Godiva, a butterfly, and Winnie the Pooh (winner of the Halloween contest).

18 started the 50 with 17 finishing. Dick Root and OFW Alivia nipped Lynn Rigney and Predictable, with Predictable getting Best Condition. Junior Laura Nicholes finished her first 50 on her little gray gelding Hugo, riding with sister/sponsor Beth Nicholes on DWA Zifhaffir. They were the Princesses on trail. We all forgot to throw Laura in the water trough afterwards for her congratulations, so, next year, watch out, Laura!

9 started the 25 with 8 finishing. Debbie Grose and her super horse Jack out-squeaked Nance Worman and Fancy for the win, with Jack getting Best Condition.



Our horses were fast and forward and fun on the 50. I book-ended my ride season with a substitute jockey ride on Sarah's horse Dezzie (thanks Sarah!) - started with the Owyhee Tough Sucker in April and ended with the Owyhee Hallowed Weenies. We followed Connie and DWA Saruq, and that made a most excellent 665-mile season for both horses and a first 100-miler for both (and for Junior Sarah!).


A good part of the little village that is SWITnDR came out to ride (including The Raven), or hang out and help, and to bring down the curtain on the 2017 Northwest ride season.

Bring on hairy horses and winter!

More on the ride at:
http://www.endurance.net/international/USA/2017OwyheeHallowedWeenies/

Thursday, November 02, 2017

Endurance Riding Made Easier with Help from the Green Beans

October 31, 2017

Endurance riding can be an intimidating equine sport. After all, the shortest distance offered is 25 miles long. But a grassroots effort has been growing for the past few years to help the newest riders to learn the sport, meet other new riders, and compete for fun awards just for their group of “newbies.”
 
Named after the green ribbons new members often tie into their horse’s tails, the group came to be known as the Green Beans. With a clever sense of humor, they further divide themselves into “on the vine” (less than 100 miles completed), “picked” (100-499 miles) and “cooked” (500-999 miles). Riders with more than 1,000 AERC miles can support the organization as mentors but are considered to have “miled out.”
 
There are individual and team competitions as well as prize drawings. Green Bean participation is an optional add-in for AERC members, with a nominal fee to cover prizes. “It’s not always easy being ‘green,’” said Deb Moe, one of the program administrators. She noted that sometimes just making a connection to another rider makes a huge difference in being successful.
 
The mainstay of the Green Beans is their educational support and social networking. There are a multitude of Facebook “Green Bean Endurance” pages specific to local areas or regions, with people willing to share their knowledge and create welcoming places where there are no silly questions.
 
Erin Hurley-Rosser of Texas, participates in the One Horse One Rider (individual) competition: “The Green Bean group keeps me motivated, even when my ride and ride season plans fall apart. I cheer on other teams and riders because this movement is about our combined successes. We learn and grow together, from the person who has yet to begin to conditioning, to the Green Bean who ‘miles out’, we all have something useful to share.”

Lindsay Waddell of South Carolina is on the team called High Voltage Horses: “Knowledge, encouragement, and competition all in one place—it’s a great way to start!”

Audrey Hager of Texas (team: May the Horse Be With You): “The team camaraderie is great, we share knowledge and stories and help each other out, even if we're in different regions!”

Jaime McArdle of Virginia (team: Rockin Mountain Monstas): “I love the Green Bean program because it takes a pretty individual sport and gives you a 'team' to help encourage and support each other, especially because we are new. At the rides I've begun to meet friends and create an endurance family but the Green Bean team is my first family!”
 
Find more about the Green Bean Endurance program at http://www.greenbeanendurance.org. To find out more about AERC, which has been sanctioning endurance rides across the U.S. and Canada since 1972, visit https://aerc.org. AERC’s educational program, aside from the Green Bean program, includes mentoring with longtime endurance riders, an extensive rider handbook and educational materials sent to every new AERC member.
 
More information on endurance riding is available by visiting www.aerc.org or by calling the American Endurance Ride Conference office at 866-271-2372. By request, the office will send out a free copy of the 16-page Discover Endurance Riding booklet to prospective members.