Friday, February 20, 2009

France requests change to 2008->2009 Transitional Measures

The French Federation urgently requests that the FEI reconsider it's refusal to accept modifications of the current qualification transitional measures. The Federation requests that all Star/Distance qualifications achieved under the 2008 qualification rules be accepted, for all 2009 competitions as though they had been achieved under the 2009 Star qualification rules. Without this change, it is estimated that 1500-2000 french horses will otherwise not be qualified for 2009 **/*** events.


Read more (PDF)

4 comments:

Leonard Leisens said...

Hi,
Come on... It is not just France who is mad about this transitional regulation from FEI. The Group1 and Group2 National Federations are against this.
There are also a big list of problems between european federation and FEI : Showjumping Global Champions Tour, Dressage committee. There will be a big meeting between European NF and FEI on 10th March in Deauville. Belgium has put the endurance item on the schedule of the meeting.

wait and see...

The problem is as follows :
- most of the europeaa federation have got their qualification system system well before FEI even tought about qualifications were necessary for horses and riders : 30km==>40km==>60km==>80km==>100km before being allowed to enter FEI rides
- and now the FEI would come and say "Hi guys, 'm the big brother and I will tell you how to do endurance..."
- there are in Europe thousands horses already qualified according to the 2008 system (having completed several CEI**) who would have to re-enter a CEI** before being allowed to compete on 160km
- without taking into account the horses who are already qualified at what we call the CEN (national system) level, 120 and even 160km. Those horses should START ALL OVER AGAIN.

So please, Steph, add this paragraph to the release :-)

Thanks and happy trail

Leonard, www.endurance-belgium.com

Diana Trefethen said...

Hi Leonard,

The two most vivid impressions I have of Endurance on the European continent, and please correct me if I am in error, are that a) it is all run under the auspices of FEI using their rules and their standards and b) the vast majority of riders are trying finish high in their races, climb the ladder of International Competition, garner COCs and hopefully represent their countries at the WEC. While that has been a successful formula so far, the good news for France and Belgium and anyone else that might be disenchanted with FEI's "I will tell you how to do endurance" attitude (even if they don't really know as much as they like to think they do) is that you have a different model you can follow. It's called AERC. While many of our riders want to "Top Ten", for the most part, AERC riders compete for the enjoyment of seeing new places and seeing how well they and their horses can "go the distance", "well" meaning healthily and happily, not necessarily fast. Again, it is my impression that FEI Endurance is structured to not only promote speed but to actually discourage a slower pace. Here, that's not true and the number of people in AERC who aspire to international competition is probably under 100 amongst a membership of 6900, less than 1.5%.

So if you and other riders are tired of everything in your sport being slanted towards hitting it, hitting it, hitting it and you'd like to be able to ride at the pace most suitable for you and your horses, consider forming national or multi-national associations modeled after AERC where the focus is on people and horses doing what they like, *just for the sake of doing it*, with NO pressure to prove themselves other than the pressure which they put on themselves. This would allow ride fees to be reduced (no FEI taking its cut) which might encourage more people to try the sport and maybe get hooked.

Then the next thing you have to do is introduce the Turtle Award :)

Regards, Diane

john teeter said...

most endurance rides in Europe have 2 (or 4) divisions. A Professional and an Amateur (CEI and CEN) competition with Junior/YoungRider divisions added on for a total of 6 division. The comment relating to professional refers to the liabilities foreseen if the current "transitional measures" are applied.

jt

John Teeter said...

On Feb 22, 2009, at 8:49 AM, Diane Trefethen wrote:

So if you and other riders are tired of everything in your sport being slanted towards hitting it, hitting it, hitting it and you'd like to be able to ride at the pace most suitable for you and your horses, consider forming national or multi-national associations modeled after AERC where the focus is on people and horses doing what they like, *just for the sake of doing it*, with NO pressure to prove themselves other than the pressure which they put on themselves. This would allow ride fees to be reduced (no FEI taking its cut) which might encourage more people to try the sport and maybe get hooked. ..

==

Diane,

As mentioned, there are CEI and CEN competitions (and numerous CEN rides which do not engage FEI sanctioning). I think the point you make is essentially moot.

jt